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Covenant House Alaska Receives $100,000 Grant from KeyBank To Support Programs for Homeless Youth

Feb 5, 2019 | Featured, Finance, News, Nonprofits

Grant is bank’s largest ever in the state of Alaska

ANCHORAGE—A $100,000 grant from KeyBank to Covenant House Alaska, announced as part of its annual Fire & Ice Ball, is the bank’s largest donation to date in the state of Alaska.

“At KeyBank, our mission is to help our communities thrive—and that begins with our youth, which is why we are thrilled to support Covenant House Alaska’s mission to help youth experiencing homelessness build wonderful futures,” said Alaska KeyBank President Lori McCaffrey in announcing the gift.

KeyBank’s grant comes at a critical time, with Covenant House Alaska (CHA) expanding to five programs across Anchorage to meet the growing needs of youth experiencing homelessness and trafficking. The grant was announced at last week’s Fire & Ice Ball, with funds going to keep CHA’s programs operating 24/7 and 365 days a year.

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December 2019

December 2019

The event commemorated 30 years of service at Covenant House Alaska, in an elegant nod to the 1980s when CHA first opened.

“Turnout and support were unprecedented at this year’s event,” said Alison Kear, Executive Director of CHA. “We are honored to be the recipient of KeyBank’s largest gift in the state of Alaska, which further spurred generosity among attendees. The funds raised are vital to bolstering our mission: to get our most vulnerable youth off the dangerous streets and wrap them in love, guidance and resources—all to help end the cycle of homelessness.”

Alaska Business Magazine December 2019 cover

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Navigating Medicaid

December 2019

Medicaid was enacted by the federal government in 1965 to pay for certain healthcare services for low-income families with dependent children and the aged, blind, and disabled. Though federally mandated, states share the cost of the program with the federal government, and each state creates and manages its own Medicaid plan, subject to federal approval.”

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