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EBDG Opens East Coast Office

Jan 11, 2019 | Architecture, Engineering, News, Transportation

Expansion strengthens client access and relationship management

SEATTLE, WA—Elliott Bay Design Group announced the opening of its new East Coast office in New York. The office will provide professional engineering and naval architecture services as well as waterfront development expertise to clients on the East Coast and is a springboard for future growth in the region.

“This is an exciting time for EBDG and marks a major milestone in our 30-year history,” states Christina Villiott, VP of Sales & Marketing. “This fourth office sets the stage for increased client support across the US and includes new markets for the firm along with continued growth for our employees.”

In support of this expansion, EBDG has hired Catherine (Kate) Hale to establish its East Coast presence. Kate is a Systems Engineer and a certified Port Executive. She is qualified to manage port initiatives and aid in development of Port Master Plans. Her experience includes project management and engineering oversight on urban ferry systems operating in highly-dense populations. She has assisted in the outfitting design and permitting process for multiple ferry landings on the East Coast.

Hale received a MS in Maritime Systems Environmental Engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology and a BS in Environmental Biology Science with a minor in Sustainability from Simmons College.

EBDG’s newest office is located at 181 Westchester Avenue, Suite 409 in Port Chester, New York.

Kate Hale

EBDG

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