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RIM Architects Announces Two New Principals

Sep 4, 2020 | Architecture, Right Moves

RIM Architects (RIM) announced Michelle Klouda and Jason Arnold as Principals in RIM’s Anchorage office. “Michelle and Jason actively participate in the Alaskan community, volunteering for various organizations and managing the design process for an assortment of project types. Both have demonstrated strong leadership qualities and are exceptionally qualified and well-deserving of this promotion,” remarked James Dougherty, Managing Principal of RIM’s Anchorage office. 

Klouda, a graduate of the University of Oregon with a degree in architecture, began her career at RIM in 2007 as a summer intern. “I’ve always wanted to be an ambassador for RIM. For that reason, I participate in several organizations: Downtown Community Council, Past President for the Society of American Military Engineers, Anchorage Post, and the Anchorage Downtown Partnership. As a Principal, I’ll have an even greater opportunity to contribute and represent the firm.”

Beginning at RIM as an intern in 2008, Arnold is now President of the American Institute of Architect’s  (AIA) Alaska Chapter, an Alaska State Licensing Advisor for the Architectural Experience Program (AXP) and the Architectural Registration Examinations (ARE), a member of the National Architectural Accreditation Board (NAAB) visiting team, and a member of the Food Bank of Alaska’s Building Committee. Jason is a graduate of Iowa State University with a bachelor’s in architecture and minors in digital media design and philosophy. Prior to joining RIM, he served in the US Army for ten years as an Army Resources Sergeant with several deployments to Iraq. “In my role as Principal, I plan to focus on implementing new programs, processes, and technology to streamline and improve our project delivery.”

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