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Governor-Elect Mike Dunleavy Appoints John MacKinnon as DOT Commissioner

Nov 26, 2018 | Government, Right Moves

Governor-elect Mike Dunleavy announced his appointment of John MacKinnon as commissioner of the Department of Transportation (DOT).

John MacKinnon worked as executive director of the Associated General Contractors of Alaska (AGC) from 2008-2018. Before joining AGC, he served as deputy commissioner of Highways and Public Facilities for DOT for five years. As deputy commissioner, he was responsible for day-to-day operations for the state highway program, policy and planning, administration, budget, and legislative relations.

Prior to his service at DOT, MacKinnon worked as the acting city manager during a period of transition for the City and Borough of Juneau. He also served on the Juneau Planning Commission for five years, then the Juneau Assembly for twelve years, the last six as deputy mayor. John’s twenty-four years as a building contractor and other business interests contribute to his experience and knowledge of both private and public sectors.

Mackinnon holds a bachelor’s degree in Marine Resource Ecology from Huxley College of Environmental Studies.

“John MacKinnon is a true professional, and an expert at keeping things moving, literally and figuratively,” said Governor-elect Mike Dunleavy. “I have always been impressed by John’s confidence, vision, expertise, and his ability to manage complex systems, all of which will be an asset for DOT.”

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