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Alaska Chamber Hires New Vice President

Jan 14, 2019 | News, Professional Services, Right Moves, Small Business

ANCHORAGEThe Alaska Chamber announced the hiring of Albert Fogle as Vice President. In his role, Albert will focus on advocacy, legislative issues, as well as operations and financial management.

Before joining the Chamber, Albert worked for RISQ Consulting as an Employee Benefits and Business Consultant. During his time at RISQ, he was responsible for developing, implementing, and executing strategic sales plans to achieve RISQ Consulting’s sales goals and objectives. He is a licensed life and health insurance producer and past president of the Alaska Association of Health Underwriters. Prior to RISQ, Albert served in the United States Army as an Infantry Team Leader and Communications Operator where he supervised deployment logistics valued in excess of $2 million under security access controls. His years of military service include a tour in Iraq.

Albert graduated from the University of Alaska Anchorage earning a Bachelor in Business Administration degree in Finance, with a minor in Criminal Justice. He can be contacted at [email protected] or (907) 278-2729.

“We’re fortunate to bring in someone with Albert’s experience,” said Alaska Chamber President and CEO Curtis W. Thayer. “His knowledge of Alaska’s health care insurance industry is invaluable as we formulate and develop an affordable and competitive health plan for our small business members.”

Albert replaces Ben Mulligan who recently left the Chamber to serve as the Deputy Commissioner for the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.

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