HOME | Monitor | International Association Forms to Expand Inuit Business Opportunities in Arctic

International Association Forms to Expand Inuit Business Opportunities in Arctic

Feb 12, 2020 | Monitor

Executive committee members Liz Cravalho, provisional chair; Maggie Emudluk, secretary; and Jens K. Lyberth, vice-chair, met with other founding members to establish the International Inuit Business Association in Ottawa.

IIBA

OTTAWA, CANADA—Representatives from Inuit businesses throughout Alaska, Canada, and Greenland initiated the founding meeting of the International Inuit Business Association (IIBA). The group’s newly affirmed mission is to encourage sustainable and equitable expansion of the economy throughout the Arctic to promote greater self-sufficiency in Inuit Nunaat—meaning those Arctic and sub-Arctic areas where, presently or traditional, Inuit have Indigenous rights and interests, or where Inuit culture is predominant.

“This is a transformative time for Inuit businesses in the international Arctic,” said Jim Stotts, president of ICC-Alaska and convener of IIBA’s founding meeting. “The IIBA will be a resource for Inuit business leaders who have a collective interest in ensuring the success of our northern economies.”

The IIBA was born out of the Inuit Circumpolar Council’s (ICC’s) 2018 Utqiaġvik Declaration, which urged sustainable development and collaboration among Inuit businesses as Arctic economies continue to rapidly change and interest in the Arctic grows. The ICC, in part, advocates for policies that facilitate cross-boundary trade, employment and travel across the circumpolar Arctic. The IIBA will move forward independently and as an affiliate of ICC.

“As Inuit business owners and partners, we’re seeing increased opportunities for collaboration across borders for pan-Arctic economic development,” said Liz Qaulluq Cravalho, IIBA provisional executive committee chair. “I am excited to be part of the founding of this association, open to all businesses interested in encouraging sustainable and equitable expansion of the economy of Inuit communities.”

In addition to building Inuit business relationships and promoting business development opportunities among its members, as well as recruiting businesses from Canada, the United States, Chukotka (Russia), and Greenland, the IIBA will undertake research in areas of economic priority to Inuit and participate in international organizations affecting Inuit economic and business interests.

The IIBA is currently finalizing processes for membership and recruitment.

Current Issue

February 2020

February 2020

Alaska Business Magazine February 2020 cover

In This Issue

The Art of Architecture

February 2020

Architects often find themselves facing something of a chicken and egg dilemma. When it comes to design, what takes precedence—form or function?

“It’s a great question, and it’s probably a loaded question,” says David McVeigh, president of RIM Architects. “You can ask ten different architects and get ten different answers.”

Many of the factors that influence those answers land outside the architect’s control. The client’s vision for the building, its location and intended use, the project budget, and whether the design must conform to specific guidelines are all details the architect must consider when determining how much emphasis to place on aesthetics and how much on function.

Share This