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With Three New Acquisitions, Columbia Sussex Becomes Largest Hotel Operator in the State

Oct 9, 2019 | Monitor

ANCHORAGE—Columbia Sussex, whose companies have owned and operated two of the largest hotels in downtown Anchorage for more than a decade, has acquired three new properties in Alaska’s largest city.

With 1,341 rooms now in its inventory, the purchase makes Columbia Sussex the largest full-service, year-round hotel operator in the state.

The new midtown properties include:

  • Hilton Garden Inn, 4555 Union Square Drive, 125 rooms, built in 2001
  • Hampton Inn, 4301 Credit Union Drive, 101 rooms, built in 1997
  • Homewood Suites, 101 W. 48th Ave., 122 rooms, built in 2003

They join the twenty-story Marriott Anchorage Downtown and twenty-one-story Hilton Anchorage, which Columbia Sussex has operated for more than a decade. The Hilton just underwent an extensive, multi-million-dollar renovation and the Marriott is on schedule for a similar one this winter.

“Anchorage has been a good business target for Columbia Sussex and this acquisition increases our ability to cater to smaller groups, sports teams and businesses interested in a convenient, midtown location,” said Joseph Yung, Vice President of Development for Columbia Sussex. “It also gives us more flexibility to take care of our visitors during the busy summer months, particularly the growing number who arrive via cruise ships.”

Columbia Sussex purchased the hotels from the Blackstone Group, a global hotel investment services firm.

The three new properties all feature indoor pools, fitness centers with hot tubs, 24-hour business centers, meeting space, and rooms that have been recently renovated. They will continue to operate under their current name with their current employees.

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