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Auction Puts ‘Alaska Lands in Alaska Hands,’ Earns $2.1 Million

Jul 17, 2019 | Monitor

ANCHORAGE—The state’s annual land auction saw eighty-two Alaskans offer winning bids for 832 acres of land in eighty-seven parcels across the state, with bids totaling $2,101,184, according to state land sales managers.

“We were excited to see so much interest this year, and happy to be a part of putting Alaska lands into Alaskans’ hands,” said Rachel Longacre, chief of the state land sales section in the Division of Mining, Land & Water. “Many of the bids were above fair market value, which clearly shows Alaskans’ strong desire to become landowners.”

Parcels were sold in Southeast, Southcentral, Southwest and Interior Alaska, with special interest in parcels in two new subdivisions: the Forest Highway in Yakutat, and the Sage Subdivision near McCarthy. Full results are available at the Division of Mining Land and Water’s land sales website, at https://dnr.alaska.gov/mlw/landsales/

About 130 parcels not sold at the auction will join the list of other parcels available for sale to Alaskans and non-residents in an over-the-counter (OTC) offering, starting July 24 at 10 a.m. DNR offers competitive, in-house financing for land purchases for up to twenty years for land sold by auction or OTC, Longacre said.

More information on OTC sales, including a listing of parcels available for purchase, is available at the division’s land sales website, or on pages 119 and 124 of the official state land sales brochure.

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