Northern Air Cargo Launches Freighter Service Out of Miami

Apr 25, 2018 | Transportation

Northern Air Cargo

A Northern Air Cargo 767-300 on the tarmac in Miami.
CREDIT: NORTHERN AIR CARGO

ANCHORAGE, AK—Northern Air Cargo Inc. (NAC) has acquired and been granted operating authority for its first 767-300 wide-body aircraft. NAC flight crews and maintenance technicians will be operating and maintaining a total of three newly converted 767-300 freighters by the end of 2018. The three aircraft will be branded for NAC and its sister air cargo brands, Aloha Air Cargo (Hawaii) and StratAir (Florida) and will be flying domestically as well as to International and Pacific markets.

NAC’s President and CEO David Karp said, “Our recent experience has given us the confidence to move ahead with investing in newer, larger aircraft. With this new capacity, we look forward to enhancing our services to our existing customers and expanding our operational footprint by servicing customers in new markets.” Karp went on to say, “Our growth reflects the hard work of our employees and the commitment of our shareholders to enhance the services we provide to our customers.

NAC is an operating company of Northern Aviation Services, Inc., the company operates six brands; Northern Air Cargo, Aloha Air Cargo, StratAir, Aloha Tech Ops, Northern Air Maintenance Services, and NAS Contract Services. The operating companies deliver a wide variety of US based aviation services for both domestic and international customers. Northern Aviation Services Inc. is owned by Seattle based Saltchuk.

Current Issue

Alaska Business Magazine June 2020 Cover

June 2020

Alaska Business Magazine June 2020 Cover

In This Issue

The Unbroken Supply Chain

June 2020

Alaskans have some experience both with isolation and sudden emergencies. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, seasonal flooding, and wildfires seldom schedule their arrival. And while emerging technology and developing infrastructure have allowed Alaska to become more connected, as Alaskans we know we’re still at the end of the road—even more so for those living beyond the road in Alaska’s remote communities.

Share This