Alaska Geographic Appoints Andy Hall as New Executive Director

Jan 24, 2018 | Education, Nonprofits, Science

Sam Friedman

Andy Hall, new executive director at Alaska Geographic.
IMAGE COURTESY OF ALASKA GEOGRAPHIC

Alaska Geographic welcomes Andy Hall as its new executive director. “The board of directors is looking forward to continuing the momentum that Andy has helped Alaska Geographic gain over the past eight months while he acted as interim director,” said Board Chair Sam Dennis. “Andy has demonstrated that he is the perfect leader to guide Alaska Geographic, in support of our agency partners, into a bright and sustaining future.”

Andy is a lifelong Alaskan with deep connections to Alaska’s public lands. He was born in Sitka, where his father was a historian and later a park superintendent. In the late sixties, he moved to Mt. McKinley National Park where his father served as superintendent. An accomplished author (“Denali’s Howl: The Deadliest Climbing Disaster on America’s Wildest Peak,” Dutton

2014) and former editor and publisher of Alaska magazine, Andy has dedicated his life to exploring, writing about, and supporting Alaska’s wild places. He served on Alaska Geographic’s board of directors for nine years, the last two as chairman. He lives in Chugiak with his wife, Melissa DeVaughn, and their two children, Roan and Reilly.

When considering the opportunity to lead Alaska Geographic, Andy said, “Following a lifelong appreciation for the value of wide-open spaces, my goal is to lead Alaska Geographic in delivering its mission, finding sustainable ways to support agency partners and Alaska’s public lands.”

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