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Railroad Solicits Ideas for 2020 Official Art Print

Jan 3, 2019 | Monitor, Transportation

Alaska Railroad’s Aurora Winter Train.

Alaska Railroad Corporation


Submission deadline is February 22, 2019

ANCHORAGE—In 1979, the Alaska Railroad (ARRC) began an annual art print (and poster) tradition. Four decades later, the tradition continues, as the railroad repeats a request for artists around the state to submit ideas for scenes that depict ARRC trains, routes and adventures.

Entries for the 2020 art print contest are due by Friday, Feb. 22, 2019. Once an entry is selected, ARRC will commission the artist to create a final version to be the basis for the railroad’s official 2020 commemorative print, poster and gift shop merchandise. In turn, the program helps participating artists gain exposure with a connection to a beloved icon of the 49th state.

Artist submissions must include an Alaska Railroad theme. ARRC retains all rights to the artwork. From the completed artwork, the Alaska Railroad produces up to 750 signed and numbered prints, several thousand posters and several thousand lapel pins. The railroad pays the artist $3,000 and provides 10 artist proofs and 20 posters. The artist agrees to participate in print/poster sale-and-signing events in Anchorage and in Fairbanks. Signing events may also occur in an additional community, depending on the subject of the
artwork. The Alaska Railroad pays for the artist’s travel expenses.

A list and images of previous ARRC art prints are available on the railroad’s web site at:
www.AlaskaRailroad.com > Corporate > In the Community (click on Annual Alaska Railroad Art Contest).

Artists should submit a sketch no larger than 11 x 17 inches. To provide some context, artists should also include several samples of their finished artwork.

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