1. HOME
  2.  | 
  3. Monitor
  4.  | BP to Donate BP Energy Center to Alaska Community Foundation

BP to Donate BP Energy Center to Alaska Community Foundation

Feb 12, 2020 | Monitor

Alaska Business staff

ANCHORAGE—BP is donating the BP Energy Center property and building to The Alaska Community Foundation (ACF), ensuring Alaska nonprofits will have access to the resource for years to come. BP built the Energy Center as a charitable commitment to Alaska and for sixty years has been a dedicated partner with nonprofit and educational organizations in the state.

“Of all the accomplishments we’ve had in Alaska, we believe this to be our most important. We are leaving the Energy Center here for future generations. We hope it serves as a reminder that “community” is what matters most,” said Janet Weiss, president of BP Alaska.

The facility will continue to provide a center for meetings, education, and activities for nonprofits and educational organizations throughout the state. The BP Energy Center Fund, currently at ACF, will be used to help support the costs of operating the facility.

“We are so honored to be chosen to carry on BP’s philanthropic vision for the BP Energy Center,” said ACF Board Chair Carol Gore. “It is a gift to the entire nonprofit community, and an extraordinary opportunity to amplify our mission to inspire the spirit of giving and connect people, organizations, and causes to strengthen Alaska’s communities now and forever.”

Per BP’s request, ACF will maintain the building and its purpose for a period of at least twenty years. There will be no cancellations or disruptions for upcoming scheduled events at the Energy Center. BP will continue to operate the building until the official ownership transfer of its assets to Hilcorp takes place.

Current Issue

Alaska Business June 2021 Cover

June 2021

Alaska Business Magazine June 2021 Cover

In This Issue

Alaska Problems Require Alaska Solutions

June 2021

On January 16, a fire destroyed the water plant and washeteria in the southwest Alaska village of Tuluksak. For the village of about 350 people, it was a devastating blow. The water plant was the only source of drinking water in the village, in which the primarily Yup’ik residents lack indoor plumbing and rely on honey buckets, not uncommon in the flat, swampy region.

Share This