ADOT&PF Reminds Property Owners About Driveway Snow Removal

Dec 16, 2014 | Government, Transportation

(FAIRBANKS, Alaska) – Every year, the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT&PF) receives questions focused on two areas of driveway plowing:

  • Is it OK to push snow from a driveway into the road?
  • Who is responsible for removing snow berms at driveway entrances?

Both questions are covered under section (g) of Alaska Statute 17 AAC 10.020. Here is a breakdown of what it means for residents:

Removing snow from driveways: Removing snow from driveways is the responsibility of the property owner. It is illegal to push snow into, or across, the road or right-of-way. Doing so creates hazards for those using the roadway and could create liability issues for the property owner.

The image below shows the recommended method of driveway snow removal for residents.

Snow berms blocking driveways: ADOT&PF crews try whenever possible to avoid creating berms that block entrances and driveways. Unfortunately, it is not always possible. If a snow berm created by snow removal efforts blocks a driveway, it is the responsibility of the property owner to remove it. Residents are also responsible for clearing the area around their mailbox.

Keeping Alaska’s roads clear of excess snow benefits the traveling public. ADOT&PF appreciates the efforts of the public to abide by these regulations.

The Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities oversees 254 airports, 11 ferries serving 35 communities, 5,619 miles of highway and 720 public facilities throughout the state of Alaska. The mission of the department is to “Keep Alaska Moving through service and infrastructure.”

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