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#1 Plastic Clamshells No Longer Accepted in Curbside Recycling

Jun 6, 2019 | Environmental, Government, News

ANCHORAGE—Due to changes in global recycling markets, #1 PETE plastic clamshells will no longer be accepted in any commingled curbside recycling. These changes go into effect immediately.

As a result of China’s recycling import ban there are no viable outlets for recycling plastic clamshells in Alaska or the West Coast.

“We regret having to eliminate a material from curbside recycling,” said Suzanna Caldwell, recycling coordinator for the Municipality of Anchorage Department of Solid Waste Services. “This was a difficult decision, but one that will make our recycling system more efficient.”

Anchorage began accepting clamshells in curbside recycling in 2017. The clear plastic clamshells are mostly commonly found in fruit and vegetable packaging. Clamshells are not accepted at any recycling drop-off sites.

The clamshells make up less than 1 percent of what is collected in curbside recycling.

Approximately 500 tons of curbside recycling are collected every month. The material is shipped from Anchorage to the Lower 48 on donated backhaul from shippers where it is then sorted and brought to market for manufacturing into recycled products.

The change in service applies to all curbside recycling regardless of the provider. Alaska Waste, Blue Arctic Waste and Solid Waste Services all currently offer curbside recycling.

All other recyclables are still allowed in curbside collection. This includes #1 plastic bottles, #2 plastic jugs, aluminum cans, steel cans, mixed paper, newspaper and cardboard.

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The Marx Bros. Café

January 2020

Jack Amon and Richard “Van” Hale opened the doors of the Marx Bros. Café on October 18, 1979; however, the two had already been partners in cuisine for some time, having created the Wednesday Night Gourmet Wine Tasting Society and Volleyball Team Which Now Meets on Sunday, a weekly evening of food and wine. It was actually the end of the weekly event that spurred the name of the restaurant: hours after its final service, Amon and Hale were hauling equipment and furnishings out of their old location and to their now-iconic building on Third Street, all while managing arguments about equipment ownership, a visit from the police, and quite a bit of wine. “If you’ve ever seen the movie ‘A Night at the Opera” starring the Marx Brothers, that’s what it was like,” Hale explains.

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