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Woman Owned Small Business Honored by SBA Alaska District Office

May 24, 2019 | Engineering, Environmental, Featured, News, Small Business

Carrie Jokiel, right, president of ChemTrack Alaska

ChemTrack Alaska

ANCHORAGE—The US Small Business Administration (SBA) Alaska District Office announces the winners of its annual awards program.

“This year’s nominees, received from around the state, personify the spirit of Alaska itself,” SBA Alaska District Director Nancy Porzio said. “The competition this year was intense with a record number of nominations. The stories of determination from this year’s winners are truly remarkable and inspiring.”

Alaska Woman-Owned Business of The Year

ChemTrack is an 8(a) and Economically Disadvantaged Women-Owned Small Business (EDWOSB) specializing in environmental engineering, remediation services, spill management, emergency response, and construction. Jokiel is a well-known business advocate at both the federal and state levels. She champions for small businesses and women-owned businesses through her community involvement, participation in hearings to the Senate Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship, and through her mentorship to many Alaskan businesses. Jokiel is a graduate from the SBA Emerging Leaders program.

“ChemTrack is incredibly honored to receive this award, we have an amazing small business community in Alaska, filled with dedicated hard-working folks,” ChemTrack President Carrie Jokiel said. “My work-family has been through it all, to be a ChemTrackian you have to work hard and you have to care – they embody those values every day.”

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