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Schedule of Anchorage Museum Programs and Exhibitions September/October 2016


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NEWS

Expansion continues with the Alaska gallery renovation

While the Alaska gallery undergoes renovation, visitors get the rare chance to see the inner workings of a history collection in several first-floor galleries that have been transformed into a working conservation lab. Here, visitors are able to study objects in the collection and learn about the re-designed Alaska gallery scheduled to open in the fall of 2017, which coincides with the 150th anniversary of the Alaska Purchase.

The construction of the museum’s new art of the North wing continues on schedule. The atrium will temporarily close beginning in January 2017 as we physically connect the current building to the new gallery spaces. This expansion will not just add 25,000 square feet for displaying more of the collection, it will also let us dedicate several galleries on the first floor to family-friendly exhibitions.

 

Winter hours begin Oct. 1

The Anchorage Museum switches to winter hours Saturday, Oct. 1. The museum will be open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday through April 30. Muse Restaurant will be open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday, and noon to 6 p.m. Sunday. The museum and restaurant will be closed Mondays. Select galleries will be open with special programming from 6 to 9 p.m. Friday.

 

Call for Creative Teens

The Anchorage Museum is looking for passionate, innovative high school-aged students to be a part of the Museum Teen Council, a group of young, creative leaders. We need teens who are passionate about something: doodling, blogging, technology, comedy, writing, music, photography, fashion, theater — anything! We need your voices, ideas, and creativity to shape how we build community at the Anchorage Museum. Apply by Oct. 1. Details at anchoragemuseum.org.

Marita Isobel Solberg

Image: Marita Isobel Solberg interweaves elements from Sámi and Northern cultures and subcultures in her music and art. She performs Sept. 23 at the Anchorage Museum. Image by Annika Lundqvist, courtesy of Marita Isobel Solberg.

OFF-SITE EVENT

Landscape Art Meet Up

1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 18

Outdoor Center at Kincaid Park, 9401 Raspberry Rd

Explore making art in an outdoor environment. Artists in all mediums from graphite and watercolor to oil are invited to gather together at Kincaid Park. No instruction is provided. Meet outside the main chalet at Kincaid. Free

 

SEPTEMBER EVENTS

Discovery Center Science Demonstrations

Noon, 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. daily

Join museum staff as they show you the surface of the sun, debunk common Alaska myths, spark a static charge, and introduce you to the Anchorage Museum’s reptiles and marine animals. Demonstrations vary. Science demonstrations: 2 p.m. daily. Animal demonstrations: Noon and 4 p.m. daily. Included with admission

 

Guided Tours

11 a.m., noon and 1 p.m. daily through Sept. 15

Join a museum docent for a 45-minute guided tour and learn about Alaska’s history, art, Indigenous culture and more. Tours vary daily. Included with admission

 

Blink: Creative Play

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays, September 1-October 27

Preschoolers and toddlers create, experiment and play with a variety of hands-on activities and demonstrations. Enjoy new themes and ways to explore the museum each week. Part of the museum's Blink program, which introduces children 5 and younger to a range of activities, including open-ended play, hands-on workshops, literacy and storytelling, art, and science. Included with admission

 

Smithsonian Spotlight: Making a difference

Noon Thursday, Sept. 1

Carpenter turned rap artist, motivational speaker and community activist, Samuel Johns (Ahtna Athabascan) discusses his work, which includes founding ForgetMeNotAK.org to help homeless people reconnect with their families. The Smithsonian Spotlight lecture series features Alaska Native artists, scholars and researchers. Hosted by the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center at the Anchorage Museum. Included with admission

 

ConocoPhillips First Friday

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2

Enjoy free general admission to the galleries, live music, battle of the breweries and a live astronomy show in the planetarium. Celebrate the opening of the exhibition “61° Studio: Northern Design,” featuring graphic designers from countries around the international North. The museum is also redefining elevator music: what was once background noise is now a live concert experience. Board the museum’s oversized elevator and enjoy music by The Acoustic Oosik. Get your monthly dose of astronomy news at 7:30 p.m. with Space Odyssey, a live planetarium show that highlights current astronomical events and discoveries. Watch previews of what’s to come in the planetarium with free trailers of upcoming films from 6 to 7 p.m. Free general admission during First Friday is made possible by ConocoPhillips. Tickets to Space Odyssey are $6.

 

John Luther Adams

Music: 6 p.m. to midnight Friday and Saturday, Sept. 2-3

Lecture: 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2

The New Yorker called John Luther Adams "one of the most original musical thinkers of the new century." Adams is a composer, whose music is inspired by the Alaska landscape. His orchestral work “Become Ocean” was awarded the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Music. In celebration of 100 years of the Pulitzer Prizes, Pulitzer is leading a Centennial Campfires Initiative as a joint venture with the Federation of State Humanities Council to tell the stories on the prize winners, finalists and their work, and by partnering with individuals and organizations to host events across the country. The Alaska Humanities Forum presents a local Campfire Event as part of this initiative by bringing John Luther Adams to Alaska. John Luther Adams will be presenting a talk, “Music in the Anthropocene”, at the Anchorage Museum 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2, with a reception at 8 p.m. A growing number of geologists believe we have entered a new period — the Anthropocene — in which the dominant geologic force is humanity itself. John Luther Adams discusses his work and what the Anthropocene might mean for a composer and other creative artists working today.  On Sept. 2 and 3, people can experience a special installation of Adams' work “Veils and Vesper” in the museum's atrium. The complete work is 6-hours long, beginning at 6 p.m. and ending at midnight. The work is made up of distinct but related electronic soundscapes that are meant to be heard by moving through space — either as individual pieces or by taking in the immersive whole. Held in partnership with the Alaska Humanities Forum. Included with admission, which is free Friday evening as part of ConocoPhillips sponsorship of First Friday.

 

Battle of the Breweries

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2

Join us in Muse restaurant for beer flights on First Friday. September brings new Reds. Come out and try Denali Brewing Company’s Single Engine Red, Kassik’s Brewery Orion’s Quest Red, and introducing newcomer Arkose Brewery’s High Ridge Double Red Ale. Ages 21 and older. Flights are $7

 

Polar Nights

6 to 9 p.m. Fridays through Dec. 30

This Friday night series enlivens our nights through activities centering around art, culture, the environment, and the way Northern urbanites gather and meet. Part of the Anchorage Museum’s Polar Lab, a series of programs exploring life in the North. Selected galleries and spaces are open late every Friday, and museum admission is discounted.

 

Music in the Museum

12:15 to 1 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9 and 16

Enjoy a lunchtime classical concert for all ages presented by the Sitka Summer Music Festival, which brings world-class musicians to Alaska. On Sept. 9, string trio Kurt Nikkanen, Scott Rawls, and Zuill Bailey perform. Sept. 16 performance includes pianist Piers Lane, violinist Gil Morgenstern, and cellist Zuill Bailey. Included with admission

 

Polar Nights: Drop-In Figure Drawing

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 9

Throughout history artists have studied from a live model to develop their drawing abilities, and today figure drawing continues to be the best way to sharpen ones perceptual and drawing skills. Join us for an uninstructed drop-in nude figure drawing session. $15 general, $5 student includes admission

 

Muse Monthly Wine Tasting

5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 15

Join us for our monthly wine tasting in Muse. September features Marietta Winery, a small, family-owned winery in California, with a flight consisting of their Old Vine Red, Christo and Armé to enjoy. Ages 21 and older. Flights are $25

 

Design Weekend

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Friday through Sunday, Sept. 16-18

Design Weekend Anchorage creates connections throughout the city and state and draws international parallels. Design Weekend focuses on connecting the public to design through a series of programs that celebrate, educate and inspire and prompt discussion about the role design and a specific visual and conceptual identity plays in Alaska and the North — to establish a sense of place, community and aspiration. Design Weekend creates collaborative opportunities where allied design professionals come together to enliven the city and to blur boundaries between disciplines, ideas, and talents. Design Weekend encourages a new definition of what Alaska is visually through highlighting distinct local materials, voices, images, and ideas. $20 one-day pass, $50 three-day pass, $400 institutional pass for up to 10 people. Scholarship opportunities available; see anchoragemuseum.org/designweekend for details.

 

Polar Nights: Marita Isobel Solberg

7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 23

Join us for a performance by musician and visual artist Marita Isobel Solberg. Solberg experiments with many different media in her work, and interweaves elements from Sámi and Northern culture and subcultures as she embodies personas or characters of varied properties. Included with admission, which is half-price as part of the museum’s Friday night series Polar Nights.

 

Museum Day Live

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24

Visit the Anchorage Museum for free as a part of Smithsonian Magazine’s Museum Day Live! The national event encourages people to explore museums, cultural institutions, zoos, aquariums, parks and libraries—which will offer free admission for the day. Visitors can download Museum Day Live tickets at www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-2016/. Free Anchorage Museum general admission with tickets, limited to two people per household. Note the museum is closing at 3 p.m. Sept. 24.

 

Anchorage Museum Gala

In•Visible: An Evening of Art and Camouflage

5:30 to 10 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24

In nature, camouflage is about blending in. In fashion, it’s about standing out. At the Anchorage Museum gala, it’s the inspiration for a new museum after-hours experience. The Anchorage Museum is bringing the gala back to the museum for an intimate evening full of music, exploration, art creation and unique opportunities to support your museum. A live auction includes one-of-a-kind museum experiences and new ways to enjoy art. Let our upcoming exhibition, “Camouflage: In Plain Sight,” inspire your attire to highlight the way you want to be seen or unseen. Whether you dress in classic formalwear or add a camouflage twist, you’ll find an engaging evening of creative art, food and diversion on Sept. 24. Purchase tickets online at www.anchoragemuseum.org/gala. Upgrade for a VIP experience (includes VIP Reception, After Party, and Museum parking). Member discount now available. Tickets start at $130.

 

Polar Nights: Without Boundaries Exhibit Opening

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 30

The exhibition “Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations” fosters conversations about topics important to life in the North. Edgar Heap of Birds is an internationally known artist from Oklahoma whose work is focused upon social justice. As part of this exhibition, Heap of Birds will have a temporary public art installation on the museum lawn that explores sovereignty and language. Opening night, Heap of Birds will discuss his artwork and this project with the museum. James Luna is a celebrated visual and performance artist from California whose work confronts stereotypes and misconceptions held by society. Luna has a multimedia installation in “Without Boundaries” and at the opening will perform “Ishi: The Archive Performance” about a Native man who spent the last five years of his life as a living specimen at the University of California Museum at Berkeley in the 1910s. This performance may contain mature content. Included with admission, which is half-price as part of the museum’s Friday night series Polar Nights.

 

Please note: During free and reduced-admission events, fees still apply for planetarium shows unless otherwise specified.

 

OCTOBER EVENTS

 

Discovery Center Science Demonstrations

Noon, 2 p.m., and 4 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday

Join museum staff as they show you the surface of the sun, debunk common Alaska myths, spark a static charge, and introduce you to the Anchorage Museum’s reptiles and marine animals. Demonstrations vary. Science demonstrations: 2 p.m. daily. Animal demonstrations: Noon and 4 p.m. daily. Included with admission

 

Teen Volunteer Training

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 1-2

Apply today to join the Anchorage Museum Teen Volunteer Program and become an interpretive guide by helping visitors understand and interact with the various topics and content presented through our exhibitions and programs. Submit application online by Sept. 19. Ages 13 through 17.

 

Material Traditions: Twining Cedar

1 to 3 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Oct. 6-7

Twined red cedar bark baskets are an essential element of Tsimshian culture. Created in varied styles and designs, cedar baskets were used to store provisions, tools and blankets, and for plant harvesting and berry picking. They were a link between the people and the land – economically, historically and spiritually. Master artists Delores Churchill (Haida) and Holly Churchill (Haida), with apprentice Kandi McGilton (Tsimshian), will demonstrate how these baskets are made and share knowledge of their cultural meanings during the Twining Cedar artists’ residency at the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center that week. The artists will teach and document techniques and compare their own work to historical examples in the Living Our Cultures, Sharing Our Heritage exhibition on the second floor of the museum’s west wing. The program is in partnership with the Hyaak Foundation of Metlakatla and is sponsored by the CIRI Foundation, Smithsonian Council for Arctic Studies, Anchorage Museum, Central Council Tlingit and Haida Tribes of Alaska, Sealaska Heritage Foundation and Alaska State Council on the Arts. Included with admission

 

ConocoPhillips First Friday

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7

Enjoy free general admission to the galleries, live music, battle of the breweries and a live astronomy show in the planetarium. We're redefining elevator music: what was once background noise is now a live concert experience. Board the museum’s oversized elevator and enjoy music by the Nuther Brothers. Join us for an opening reception for artist Allison Warden’s solo exhibition “The Future/Ancient.” Watch previews of what’s to come in the planetarium with free trailers of upcoming films from 6 to 7 p.m. Free general admission during First Friday is made possible by ConocoPhillips.

 

Battle of the Breweries

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7

Join us in Muse restaurant for beer flights on First Friday. Octoberfest will be the theme for this month’s battle. We’ll have something special in store and promise it will sweep us off to Bavaria. Ages 21 and older. Flights are $7

 

What’s Needling You? Moose Hide Nametag Workshop with Gretchen Sagan

3 to 5 p.m. Saturdays, Oct. 8-29

Has something been needling you lately?  Do you feel that the world needs to remember your name, always and forever beaded into moose hide?  Join interdisciplinary Iñupiaq artist Gretchen Sagan in the exhibition “Unipkaaġusiksuġuvik (the place of the future/ancient),” created by Allison Warden. Sagan’s work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and is a part of many private and public collections. Bring two or three vials of number 10-sized beads in colors you love. Included with admission

 

Talk Show Tuesdays (and Thursdays Too)

2 to 3 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, Oct. 11-Nov 22

Join “Aku” (the performance name of Allison Warden) for an hour of conversation and laughter with guests from around Alaska. Aku is a “cross between Oprah, Barbara Walters and Ellen DeGeneres.” October guests: Liz Medicine Crow (Oct. 11), Dr. Gary Ferguson (Oct. 13), George Holly (Oct. 18), Surprise Mystery Guest (Oct. 20), Yaari Walker (Oct. 25), and Stephen Blanchett (Oct. 27). Held in conjunction with and as part of the exhibition “Unipkaaġusiksuġuvik (the place of the future/ancient)” created by Allison Warden. Included with admission

 

Crosscurrents: Tales of the City: Writing from Alaska’s Urban Hubs

7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13

Modern Alaska life exists in the dichotomy between what some call the Great Land—majestic lands teeming with wildlife—and the goings-on of our mostly urban people. How does this dichotomy affect urban Alaskans and the stories they tell? Join Martha Amore and Lucian Childs, editors of “Building Fires in the Snow: A Collection of Alaska LGBTQ Short Fiction and Poetry,” along with featured anthology contributors for a moderated discussion. “Building Fires in the Snow” is an anthology that opens a window onto the diverse lives of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Alaskans. Presented in partnership with 49 Writers. Free

 

Spark!Nite

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 14

Anchorage Museum’s Smithsonian Spark!Lab is partnering with Evie’s Brinery to present a hands-on evening highlighting local innovation and inventive possibilities. Evie will be present to discuss her innovative process of fermenting Alaska grown garden vegetables, while providing samples for participants to try. Participant will also have the opportunity to express their own inventive creativity through fun Spark!Lab hands-on activities. Included with admission. Admission is half-price as part of Polar Nights, the museum’s ongoing series Friday Evenings.

 

Wells Fargo Free Day: Alaska Day

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16

Play Alaska Science Roulette, watch Alaska-themed planetarium shows, or create a piece of art using just $0.02 – the price the United States paid for each acre of land in Alaska. Activities from 1 to 4 p.m. Planetarium films: “Above Alaska” about the northern lights at 1:30 p.m. and “River of Bears” about brown bears in summer at 2:30 p.m. Activities from 1 to 4 p.m. Free general museum admission all day courtesy of Wells Fargo. Planetarium tickets are $4 to $6.

 

Iñupiaq Church Service

Church: 1 to 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16

Singspiration: 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 16

Join “Aku” (the performance name of Allison Warden) as she leads a traditional service in Iñupiaq. Aku grew up going to Iñupiaq services at the Presbyterian Church in Fairbanks, Alaska. The service will be followed by song. Held in conjunction with and as part of the exhibition “Unipkaaġusiksuġuvik (the place of the future/ancient)” created by Allison Warden. Included with admission, which is free Oct. 16 thanks to Wells Fargo sponsorship.

 

Muse Monthly Wine Tasting

5 to 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20

Join us for our monthly wine tasting in Muse. Beloved Sonoma Cutrer Vineyards play host to this month’s tasting. On deck are Russian River Chardonnay, Cutrer Chardonnay, and Russian River Pinot Noir. Ages 21 and older. Flights are $25

 

Polar Nights: Drop-In Figure Drawing

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21

Throughout history artists have studied from a live model to develop their drawing abilities, and today figure drawing continues to be the best way to sharpen ones perceptual and drawing skills. Join us for an uninstructed drop-in nude figure drawing session. $15 general, $5 student includes admission

 

Polar Nights: Unbound

6 to 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 21

Grab a drink and gather for an intimate hour of poetry readings by local authors. Part of Unbound, the museum's new literary series, which loosens words from the page in monthly experimental events. Included with admission

 

Conceal | Reveal

8 p.m. to midnight Friday, Oct. 28

Celebrate the opening the museum’s major fall exhibition “Camouflage: In Plain Sight” with a costume party. Explore being seen and unseen with live music, art activities and a secret speakeasy. Enhance your attire with supplies in the museum’s Art Lab. Artist interventions include painter James Temte facilitating a unique tour of objects that inspire his creative practice. Look closely, ask questions and join in conversations about what is hidden and what is exposed. 40 Below members can relax in a special VIP lounge. 21 years and older. $20 member/$25 non-member

 

Teen Art Class: Anime Fashion Illustration

1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 10

Learn to illustrate your own character based on your interest in comics, cartoons, anime, manga, video games or film. Use quality tools to learn shading and perspective techniques. Add accessories and props with textured or reflective surfaces and create the costume necessary to protect or empower your character. Supplies included. Ages 13-17. $35 general, $30 member

 

Adult Art Class: Landscape Painting Class

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 11

Plein air painting, also known as landscape painting, means painting in the open air. This workshop will give you the opportunity to experience the unique pleasure of painting in nature. We'll learn some of the history of plein air painting, look at the the work of some of our predecessors and contemporaries, and learn techniques for capturing the light and atmosphere of the great outdoors. The materials and Instruction for this workshop will be in oil paint. This class is geared to those new to plein air painting but artists of all levels are welcome. This class will be held outside at Kincaid Park, so please dress accordingly. Class meets at the Outside Center, Kincaid Park, 9401 W Raspberry Road. Taught by Anchorage artist Karl Koett. $100 general, $85 member

 

Family Watercolor Class

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 17

Learn to paint Alaska landscapes with the whole family. Adults and children alike will use bright watercolors to capture different natural scenes, and learn techniques they can use at home. Taught by UAA art professor David Pettibone. Ages 5 and older. Supplies included. $10 general, $8 member per registrant

 

Life Hack: Careers in the Arts

1 to 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 24

Join us for a panel discussion on careers in the arts. Panelists from a variety of professions will discuss their own path, the state of arts professions in Anchorage, and what young people can do to further their artistic career. All ages. Included with admission

 

Teen Art Class: 16mm Direct Animation Camera-less Workshop

10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 8

This animation workshop will demonstrate how to draw, paint, etch, and collage directly onto 16mm movie film, resulting in abstract animations. It is designed to introduce and explore the ability to articulate movement through the tactile gesturing’s of direct 16mm animation. The workshop will begin with a brief history of filmmakers using these methods. We will end the workshop with the premier of the film. No prior filmmaking experience needed. Ages 13-17. $35 general, $30 member

 

Adult Art Class: Figure Drawing

10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 9

Throughout history artists have studied from a live model to develop their drawing abilities, and today figure drawing continues to be the best way to sharpen ones perceptual and drawing skills. In this one-day workshop, you will be introduced to the practice of drawing the human figure. We’ll work together through lecture, demonstration, and most importantly direct observation from the live model. Our approach will be to look at the whole figure in space first, establishing the major proportions and forms, followed by the development of forms and details on this structure. We’ll be working mostly in graphite and charcoal so some experience with basic dry media will be helpful, but artists of all levels are welcome. Taught by Anchorage artist Karl Koett. $100 general, $85 member

 

Family Animal Illustration Class

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 15

Learn to illustrate your favorite animals with the whole family. In addition to basic animal drawing, adults and children will learn how to use patterns and other techniques to portray the fur, feathers, and scales in the animal kingdom. Taught by UAA art professor David Pettibone. Ages 5 and older. Supplies included. $10 general, $8 member per registrant

 

History Lab: Monsters of Alaska

1 to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22

Our state history has a spooky side. Learn about the haunted past of Alaska and then design your own Alaska ghoul, ghost, or Iliamna Sea Monster, a large, water-dwelling animal with a head and tail similar to that of a wolf, and a body like an orca. All ages. Supplies included. Included with admission

 

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

All exhibitions are included with museum admission unless otherwise noted.

 

61° Studio: Northern Design

On view Sept. 2, 2016 through Jan. 7, 2017

View graphic design by more than 50 designers from countries around the international North. This exhibition looks at graphic design throughout Northern countries — from Alaska in the United States to the Nordic countries of Iceland, Greenland, Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The exhibition connects the these places and hints at a global northern identity. Large posters highlight language, visual images and culture of the Circumpolar North. The works represent the activity of northern communities, images and type that reflect place and people, and an interest in design excellence at the top of the world. Held in conjunction with Design Weekend in September.

 

Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations

On view Sept. 30, 2016 through Feb. 12, 2017

This exhibition combines a series of public programs and art installations that explore cross-disciplinary, multi-platform conversations. Artists, Indigenous leaders, and scientists address common misperceptions in and outside the North to foster critical commentary about these issues. Curated by Sonya Kelliher-Combs, the exhibition features works by Indigenous artists from Alaska and around the world, while conversations can be spontaneous, among museum visitors, or will be formal public programs that occur in the space throughout the run of the exhibition where members of the public can observe and/or participate. The artists involved include Edgar Heap of Birds, James Luna, Shan Goshorn, Da-ka-xeen Mehner, Jessie Kleemann, Nicholas Galanin, Charlene Teters, Barry Pottle, Larry McNeil, and Emily Johnson.

 

Unipkaaġusiksuġuvik (the place of the future/ancient)

On view Oct. 7 through Nov. 27, 2016

This multimedia installation and two-month performance by Allison Warden, an Iñupiaq interdisciplinary artist based in Anchorage, takes the form of an Iñupiaq ceremonial qargi. Warden's version is a futuristic recreation of a ceremonial house, where she allows her audience to gently explore what these spaces might have felt like, but in a contemporary context. Warden describes the ceremonial space as existing "in the space of where the hyper-future meets the superancient, a liminal space where myths are born and the Eagle Mother is honored with ceremony and dance."

 

Camouflage: In Plain Sight

On view Oct. 28, 2016 through Feb. 5, 2017

This 7,500-square-foot exhibition explores how we work to be seen and unseen. Through the lenses of natural history, military history, art, design, technology, fashion and popular culture, Camouflage highlights the contrast between the functional and cultural. Included in the exhibition are historical objects, natural history specimens, items from popular culture, and major works of modern and contemporary art by artists like Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Cindy Sherman. Camouflage also explores how contemporary society and new technology continually transform the way we hide in plain sight, even to create anti-camouflage: invisibility cloaks inspired by the dermal modification properties of snakes, fish and butterflies; algorithm-based data “masking"; counter-surveillance cosmetics and apparel that thwart thermal imaging and confuse facial recognition systems.

 

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Exhibitions are included with museum admission unless otherwise noted.

 

Our Story

On view through Sept. 11

Alaska Native artists’ perspectives are featured in this exhibition guest curated by Drew Michael. This exhibition features perspectives of Alaska Native artists, whose works often knit together past and present generations. Presented from multiple voices and showcasing a blending of techniques, “Our Story” explores place and culture through contemporary art.

 

View From Up Here: The Arctic at the Center of the World

On view through Oct. 2

Interest in the Arctic has preoccupied explorers for hundreds of years, and that fascination with the North continues today. “View From Up Here: The Arctic at the Center of the World” is an international contemporary art exhibition that highlights investigations into the Arctic through the perspective of artists. The exhibition conveys a complexity of place and people through film, photographs, installations, and sculptures that highlight Arctic cultures, landscape, scientific research, and visions of the future. Participating artists include: Nicholas Galanin (Alaska), Anna Hoover (Alaska/Washington), Jeroen Toirkens (Holland), Derek Cote (Michigan), Marek Ranis (North Carolina), Christoph Kapeller (California), Paul Walde (Canada), John Grade (Washington), Magali Daniaux and Cedric Pigot (France), Mary Mattingly (New York), Annesofie Norn (Denmark), Bryndis Snaebjornsdottir and Mark Wilson (Iceland/England). The exhibition has components installed throughout the museum, from formal galleries to an atrium "living room" and installations in common spaces and outdoors. It is accompanied by public programs, including performances and temporary installations in the museum and in the community. A corresponding publication looks at the North beyond black-and-white perspectives.

 

Conservation Lab and Visible Storage

On view through September 2017

While the Alaska gallery undergoes renovation, the Anchorage Museum will transform several first-floor galleries into visible storage and a conservation lab. Visitors will be able to see what’s normally behind-the-scenes, learn about the new Alaska gallery opening fall 2017, and have the opportunity to discuss objects in the Anchorage Museum’s collection.

 

VISITOR INFORMATION AND MUSEUM HOURS

 

The Anchorage Museum’s mission is to connect people, expand perspectives, and encourage global dialogue about the North and its distinct environment.

 

SUMMER HOURS

Museum

May 1 through Sept. 30

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily

 

Muse Restaurant

11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday

 

Polar Nights

Special programming from 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays

Free or discounted museum admission

 

WINTER HOURS

Museum

Oct. 1 through April 30

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday

 

Muse Restaurant

11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday through Saturday

11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Wednesday

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday

 

Museum Store and Atrium Cafe

Open during museum hours

 

GENERAL ADMISSION

Free for museum members, $15 adults (18-64), $12 Alaska resident adults (18-64), $10 military/senior citizens/students, $7 ages 3 to 12, free ages 2 and younger. Visitors can find general museum information at (907) 929-9200 or www.anchoragemuseum.org.

 

Visitors with disabilities who need special assistance may call (907) 929-9254.

 

Parking is available in the underground garage on evenings and weekends.

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