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Anchorage Museum 2017 May-June Programs and Exhibitions Schedule


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Save the Date for the new wing grand opening

Friday, Sept. 15 through Sunday, Sept. 17

The grand opening for the new 31,000-square-foot wing, the new Alaska exhibition, the Art of the North exhibition and the expanded Discovery Center happens Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 15-17. Look for opening weekend's event schedule online by late summer at anchoragemuseum.org.

 

MAY EVENTS

 

Discovery Center Science Labs

Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. daily

Ask questions, make predictions and conduct experiments at the museum’s hands-on Exploration Station. New themes monthly. Included with admission.

 

Blink: Creative Play

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursdays
NOTE: In June, Blink will be shifting to a summer schedule, occurring once monthly on June 20, July 18 and Aug. 22 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. during Lunch on the Lawn. Weekly Blink programming will return in the fall.  

Engage young children through open-ended play and hands-on activities in storytelling, art and science. Best for ages 5 and younger. Included with admission.

 

Conservation Lab: Talk with a Conservator

1 to 2 p.m. Fridays

Chat with museum staff about conserving the collection. Included with admission.

 

Blink: Storytime in the Dome

10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday, May 4

Enjoy a live retelling of classic and modern tales in this immersive Thomas Planetarium experience. Blink engages young children through open-ended play, hands-on workshops, storytelling, art and science. Best for ages 5 and younger. Included with admission.

Painting Night at Muse

6 to 9 p.m.Thursday, May 4

Alaska Spruce and Raven on birch wood

Bring a friend, order an appetizer and indulge your inner artist. Create art in the style of a rustic wood-burned design using acrylic paint on a 12x24-inch natural birch plank. Taught by artist Christina Wilson with guidance on how to display the piece at home. Stencil available for those who do not wish to draw free-hand. $45, museum members receive a 10 percent discount; includes instruction and materials. Food and beverages are extra. Pre-registration encouraged, 929-9230 or anchoragemuseum.org/calendar.

 

First Friday at the Anchorage Museum

6 to 9 p.m. Friday, May 5

Enjoy free admission to galleries, a live performance by Blevin Blectum in the Thomas Planetarium, and music from KillBillSax in the west elevator from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free admission thanks to ConocoPhillips. Thomas Planetarium admission is extra.

 

Slow exhibition opens

6 to 9 p.m.

Slow TV (Sakte-TV in Norwegian) is a term used for a genre of live "marathon" television coverage of an ordinary event in its complete length. Its name is derived both from the long endurance of the broadcast and the natural slow pace of the program's progress. It was popularized in the last decade by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK), beginning with the broadcast of a 7-hour train journey in 2009. Slow TV has become widely popular in Norway – so much so that the BBC and Netflix have adopted the programming. Free.

 

Free Film: Happy People: A Year in the Taiga

6 p.m.

Film directed by Werner Herzog; 2010; 95 minutes

This documentary depicts the life and work of the trappers of Bakhtia, a village in the heart of the Siberian Taiga, where daily life has changed little in over a century.

 

Battle of the Breweries

6 to 9 p.m.

Muse features wheat beers in this evening’s Battle of the Breweries: Blue Moon Belgian Wit, Kenai Brewing Honeymoon Hefeweizen and Glacier Brewhouse Hefeweizen. Enjoy a beer flight with three draft beers and a specially paired appetizer for $20. Ages 21 and older.

 

Live in the Planetarium: Electronic music with Blevin Blectum
7:30 p.m.
Enter the planetarium for a live performance of music and projection with Rhode Island-based electronic musician and multimedia artist Blevin Blectum. Combining sound, imagery and costume, Blevin Blectum creates performances that explore topics from science fiction to ornithology. $10, $8 for members.

 

Blevin is half of the music group 'Blectum from Blechdom' with Kristin Grace Erickson, aka Kevin Blechdom, and a third of 'The Traveling Bubble Ensemble,' with Kelley Polar and Elise Kuder. She has performed and toured extensively since 1998, with releases on record labels Aagoo, Estuary Ltd., Tigerbeat6, DeluxeRecs, Praemedia, Vague Terrain, Phthalo and more. She holds degrees from Oberlin College/Conservatory, Mills College, and Brown University. Blevin designs and creates sound for toys at Hasbro in Providence, Rhode Island.

 

The Business of Art: Creative Capital Workshop

3 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 11

Take your creative practice to the next level with Colleen Keegan from Creative Capital, a national non-profit that provides artists with funding, counsel and career development. Designed for professional artists, this workshop combines nuts-and-bolts strategies with an empowering approach for integrating strategic planning and business management skills into creative practice. Space is limited. Preregistration requested, anchoragemuseum.org/calendar. Free.

 

North by North/Week of the Arctic 2017

Various times Thursday, May 11 through Sunday, May 14

Anchorage is host to a variety of activities from May 11 through 14 designed to celebrate the state’s Arctic, share that Arctic with community members and attract visitors from other Arctic states to learn, exchange and build. Together, these events form North by North, an introduction to and reclaiming of Arctic innovation, resilience and sustainability. Each is driven by local and public participation spanning the Circumpolar North. Throughout the four days, there will be several art installations, public talks, an arts and crafts expo, exhibition tours, Arctic films, music, dancing, Northern foods and beer, curated conversations, and Arctic game demonstrations at the Anchorage Museum and select downtown venues. For details and a complete schedule, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Center/Periphery

On view May 11

Center/Periphery is a series of international convenings and art installations that look at places perceived as both on the edge and at the center, through culture, design and discussion. Featured are international artists and designers Armando Marino (Exile), KUO I-Chen (STUPIN), Graham Hogg of Lateral North (Mapping Anchorage) and Eames Demetrios (Kcymaerxthaere) Included with museum admission, free on May 13-14. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting Streaming

2 to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 11

Watch the Arctic Council Chairmanship transfer from the United States to Finland as it happens in Fairbanks from the Anchorage Museum. The Arctic Council focuses on issues of sustainable development and environmental protection in the Arctic. The U.S. Chairmanship began in 2015, and runs through the Ministerial meeting taking place in Fairbanks May 11, at which point Finland assumes the Chairmanship of the Arctic Council. Eight Arctic nations are involved in the Arctic Council as well as six indigenous organizations. Livestreaming of the Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting is part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Innovate Arctic

8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday, May 12

Innovate Arctic builds on a long tradition of Alaskans and northern peoples finding solutions to challenges within the environment upon which they depend. The day is built around TED-style talks from high-level speakers representing all eight Arctic nations, each of whom will bring their experience, vision and passion for the topic to Anchorage. Additionally, interactive exhibits featuring top Alaska innovators will highlight newly developed products and processes. Topic-driven breakout sessions will engage the audience in lessons learned, best practices, challenges and potential opportunities, including cross-border cooperation and joint ventures. International and Alaska speakers will lead discussions around innovation related to Arctic topics that include cold climate housing, northern agriculture, tourism, renewable energy, telecom and education. The purpose of this event is to inspire Arctic citizens to dream big, import and export thought-economy, and encourage collaboration across the Arctic. VIP Dinner at 49th State Brewing features an Arctic DJ, visiting international speakers and Alaska’s business elite. Innovate Arctic is being held at the Anchorage Museum, is $95 and requires requires pre-registration.

 

Polar Bear Garden exhibition tour

Noon Friday, May 12

The Polar Bear Garden exhibition looks at the connections between Alaska and Russia since the U.S. purchase of Alaska in 1867.

 

Circumpolar Film Festival

8 to 10 p.m. Friday, May 12 – indoors, west wing, fourth floor

10:30 p.m. Friday, May 12 – outdoors on museum lawn

Enjoy a night of Arctic films. Film producers and film festival organizers from six Arctic nations and Alaska are screening highlights from film festivals around the Arctic during the Circumpolar Film Festival. Purchase a $20 wrist band in advance for admission to all film festival venues May 12-14, otherwise $10 cover charge if ticketed onsite. The film festival is part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arts, Crafts and Culture Expo

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 13

Artists, artisans and craftspeople from eight Arctic nations, including Alaska representing the U.S., have been invited to participate in this two-day cultural exhange. Also included are song and dance performances, poetry readings and Arctic Winter Games demonstrations. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Polar Bear Garden exhibition tour

10 a.m. Saturday, May 13

The Polar Bear Garden exhibition looks at the connections between Alaska and Russia since the U.S. purchase of Alaska in 1867.

 

Arctic Issues: Ivory

11 a.m. Saturday, May 13

Will an ivory ban criminalize indigenous artists’ work in Alaska? Artist Susie Silook; Vera Metcalf, director of the Eskimo Walrus Commission (EWC) at Kawerak, Inc. in Nome; and Dalee Sambo Dorough, University of Alaska Anchorage will discuss issues affecting Alaska’s walrus ivory art market and the efforts underway to protect Alaska Native artists. Alvin Amason, University of Alaska Anchorage professor of Native Arts. Free. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center: Living Our Cultures exhibition tour

11:30 a.m. Saturday, May 13

Gain a better understanding of Alaska’s indigenous cultures on this tour through 600 Alaska Native artifacts. Learn about traditional life in Alaska’s diverse regions through clothing, tools, ceremonial objects and more.

 

I Am Inuit Discussion

Noon Saturday, May 13

I Am Inuit is a project of the Inuit Circumpolar Council-Alaska that seeks to connect the world with Alaska Inuit (Inupiat, Yup’ik, Cup’ik and St. Lawrence Island Yupik) and the Arctic through common humanity. Beginning in 2015, photographer Brian Adams traveled to Alaska Arctic villages to capture the portraits and stories of people, as well as the landscape, as a meaningful way to promote understanding and to connect many people outside the region to the Arctic. Join a discussion with Adams, James Stotts, president of the ICC-Alaska, and Alaska Arctic residents who have participated in the project. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Circumpolar Film Festival Continues

1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 13 – west wing, fourth floor

4 p.m. Saturday, May 13 – museum auditorium

5 p.m. Saturday, May 13 - Williwaw

6 p.m. Saturday, May 13 – museum auditorium

8 p.m. – midnight Saturday, May 13 – Alaska Experience Theatre

Film producers and film festival organizers from six Arctic nations and Alaska screen highlights from film festivals around the Arctic. Purchase a $20 wrist band in advance for admission to all film festival venues May 12-14, otherwise $10 cover charge if ticketed onsite. The film festival is part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Art at the Center/Periphery

1 p.m. Saturday, May 13

The Arctic – like many other places in the world – is often perceived as at the edges by outsiders, separated by geography or politics. Artist voices in these places represent resilience and distinct perspectives and connections to the globe This discussion features artists and designers from Scotland, Cuba and Taiwan. Hear presentations by designer Graham Hogg/Lateral North and strategic communications manager Fergus Bruce/The Soluis Group Design Visualization Studios, both of Scotland; artists Armando Marino of Cuba/U.S. and KUO I-Chen of Taiwan. Free. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Center/Periphery

2 p.m. Saturday, May 13

Places that are constructed as peripheral are not necessarily passive recipients of global processes and issues. Instead, these places of political and geographical isolation become centers of resilience and innovation. This panel explores places at the center of global movements, influence and discussion, much like the Arctic. Included are artists Marek Ranis (Poland), Armando Marino (Cuba) and KUO-I Chen (Taiwan); designer Graham Hogg (Scotland); and scholar Robert Templer (Spain/Hungary). Free. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Resilience and Resistance

3 p.m. Saturday, May 13

Anchorage First Lady Mara Kimmel and visiting Central European University scholar Robert Templer will explore the many ways humans – from the Arctic to places around the globe – have been adaptive and resilient. The discussion will be moderated by Fran Ulmer, chair of the U.S. Arctic Research Commission and include a special introduction through a poetry reading by Toby Widdicombe. As First Lady of Anchorage, Mara Kimmel continues to be inspired by our neighbors who come from all walks of like, backgrounds and places. Her pusuit for social justice has been a lifelong endeavor and passion. She is motivated by the many people she has met and worked with over the years who have stood in the face of trauma, violence and persecution, yet who maintain their strength and resilience. Robert Templer, director at the Shattuck Center on Conflict, Negotiation and Recovery at the CEU, has worked on public policy and conflict issues for the last 20 years around the globe. Free. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Lawn Party: Northern Food and Beer Tasting

4 to 8 p.m. Saturday, May 13

Come to evening of great food, music, dancing, beer, games, lively discussions and art. Savor northern dishes created by chefs from Alaska and several Arctic nations (available for purchase); dance to live music and tunes by visiting Arctic DJs; see Arctic Winter Games demonstrations; view the J Raymond Mireles installation of his Neighbors project; and a take part in the beer garden featuring Alaska and northern beers (must be 21 to enter beer garden, separate ticket). This is part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arts, Crafts and Culture Expo

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 14

Artisans and craftspeople from eight Arctic nations and Alaska have been invited to participate in this two-day cultural exhange. Also included are song and dance performances, poetry readings and Arctic Winter Games demonstrations. Part of the North by North festival May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For more information, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Polar Bear Garden exhibition tour

10 a.m. Saturday, May 14

The Polar Bear Garden exhibition looks at the connections between Alaska and Russia since the U.S. purchase of Alaska in 1867. Free.

 

Arctic Issues: Northern Chefs and Local Foods  

10 a.m. Sunday, May 14

Chefs from Norway, Iceland and Russia will discuss the value of local ingredients, what is meant by Arctic Foods, emerging trends in this field, and how to continue to experiment with food culture and food systems in this region. Panel will be moderated by Dr. Elizabeth Hodges Snyder of UAA and the Alaska Food Policy Council. Free.

 

Alaska-Russia Cooperation: The Next 150 Years; Social and Cultural Exchange

11 a.m. Sunday, May 14

David Ramseur, author of Melting the Ice Curtain will moderate a panel discussion that includes Julie Decker, CEO of the Anchorage Museum; Vera Metcalf, visa-free U.S. coordinator; Craig Fleener, senior advisor on Arctic Policy for State of Alaska; Lady Waks, artist and entrepreneur from Russia; and Nikolay Gabyshev, head cook of Muus Khaya restaurant, Sakha Republic. Part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Circumpolar Film Festival Concludes

11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 14

Enjoy an afternoon of Arctic films. Film producers and film festival organizers from six Arctic nations and Alaska are screening highlights from film festivals around the Arctic during the Circumpolar Film Festival. Purchase a $20 wrist band in advance for admission to all film festival venues May 12-14, otherwise $10 cover charge if ticketed onsite.The film festival is part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Film Festival Discussion

11:30 a.m. Sunday, May 14

Film Festival directors from eight Arctic nations will discuss the ever-changing landscape of filmmaking and Northern filmmakers' role in world cinema. These professionals will touch on film festivals' challenges and influences on their respective communities. Exploring opportunities for collaboration, they will lay the groundwork for future circumpolar exchange and networking. Part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: DJ Dialogue 

1 p.m. Sunday, May 14

Deejays visiting from Iceland, Norway, Russia, Canada, Greenland and Finland will explore their commonalities, differences, challenges and opportunities. Additionally, they will discuss what is meant by "Arctic Music," the marketing and export of Arctic music, and offer listening suggestions. This panel discussion will be taped as a pilot episode for a podcast on Arctic Music. Free. Part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Arctic Issues: Architecture and Design

2 p.m. Sunday, May 14

Local architecture, design and engineering firms will present the latest innovative technology that helps communities adapt to and strengthen their resilience in the face of an Arctic environment. Including James Dougherty, RIM Architects; Roy Rountree, Bettisworth North Architects & Planners; and Tony SlatonBarker, Coffman Engineers. Part of the North by North event May 11-14 celebrating the Arctic. For a complete schedule of events, explore anchoragemuseum.org/nxn.

 

Mother’s Day Brunch in Muse
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, May 14

Treat mom on her special day. Reservations suggested; call 929-9210 or make online at muse.anchoragemuseum.org. Walk-ins welcome.

 

Guided Tours

11 a. m., noon and 1 p.m. May 15 through Sept. 15

Explore museum galleries and exhibitions with a museum docent (expert tour guide). Tours start in the Museum Store and last about 45 minutes. Tours vary daily. Check front desk for the day’s schedule. Free with admission.

 

Wells Fargo Free Day: International Museum Day

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thursday, May 18

The Anchorage Museum joins museums around the world to raise awareness of the role museums play in society. Join museum staff for free public tours or become a member today and take a members-only, behind-the-scenes tour. Film screenings and free planetarium shows. Free admission, courtesy of Wells Fargo.
 

Smithsonian Curator’s Tour

Noon to 1 p.m. Friday, May 19

Tour the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center with an anthropologist and gain a better understanding of Alaska’s Indigenous cultures through 600 Alaska Native artifacts. Learn about traditional life in Alaska’s diverse regions through clothing, tools, ceremonial objects and more. Curator-led tours are offered the third Friday of every month during the summer. Included with admission.

 

Newcomers Open Studio

11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 20

New Anchorage residents, particularly refugee and immigrant populations, are invited to an open studio to create art in response to their journey and life in Anchorage. Artist Susan Joy Share provides instruction for self-portrait sketchbooks. The artwork created will be part of Welcoming Week celebrations throughout the city slated for Sept. 15-24, with a select group of artwork displayed at the museum. Participation limited to those who have lived in Anchorage for less than three years. Register via email: rsvp@anchoragemuseum.org. Free.

 

Muse Wine Tasting

5 to 7 p.m. Saturday, May 20

Join us in Muse for a wine tasting with Whitehall Lane Winery’s sauvignon blanc, merlot and red blend. Learn about the subtle notes and flavors of these fine Napa Valley wines from St. Helena, California. $20, ages 21 and older.

 

Films to Honor 4th Avenue Theatre’s 70th Anniversary

3 p.m. Saturday, May 27, The Sword in the Stone @ ACPA

4:30 pm. Saturday, May 27, The Jolson Story @ ACPA

Screening at the Alaska Center for the Performing Arts will be two films that ran in the 4th Avenue Theatre: The Jolson Story, which was the first film presented at the 4th Avenue Theatre 70 years ago on May 30, and The Sword in the Stone, which played in the theatre when the Good Friday earthquake occurred. The screenings are sponsored by the Anchorage Museum.

 

Honoring the 4th Avenue Theatre’s 70th Anniversary

2 to 4 p.m. Sunday, May 28

Travel back in time to the 1947 opening of the 4th Avenue Theatre. Ron Holmstrom will begin the afternoon playing Cap Lathrop in a short, one-man play about the theatre’s builder. A screening of the 1924 silent film Chechahcos and a presentation by Chris Beheim on the making the feature follows. The film was produced in Alaska by Lathrop. Free with admission.

 

4th Ave Theatre Design Charrette

7 p.m. Monday, May 29

Join the Alaska Design Forum for an architectural design charrette to discuss the 4th Avenue Theatre’s architecture, its importance in Alaska history, and future possibilities for the theatre. Free (enter through 121 W. 7th Ave. entrance).

 

 

 

Discovery Center Science Labs

Noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. daily

Ask questions, make predictions and conduct experiments at the museum’s hands-on Exploration Station. New themes monthly. Included with admission.

 

Guided Tours

11 a. m., noon, 1 p.m. May 15 through Sept. 15

Explore museum galleries and exhibitions with a museum docent (expert tour guide). Tours start in the Museum Store and last about 45 minutes. Tours vary daily. Check front desk for the day’s schedule. Free with admission.

 

Conservation Lab: Talk with a Conservator
1 to 2 p.m. Fridays

Chat with museum staff about conserving the collection. Included with admission.

 

Lunch and Learn Alaska: Folkskills
Noon to 12:45 p.m. Thursday, June 1

Bring your lunch and join Folkskills’ facilitators to get your hands into materials and techniques unique to the Alaska lifestyle. Folkskills is an Alaska-based web platform that connects teachers and students of traditional skills for small, in-person workshops. Folkskills works to spread skills of cultural importance, build community and encourage people to do things in the real world rather than solely in our digital spaces. Lunch and Learn Alaska offers history and context around Alaska lifeways. Each session combines the museum collection and exhibitions with local expertise. Learn a new skill and get a taste of Alaska. $7, members receive a 10 percent discount.

 

First Friday at the Anchorage Museum
6 to 9 p.m. Friday, June 2

Enjoy elevator music by Anchorage country singer Hurricane Dave. Listen to Indie-Folk music with Joel Thiboeau performing as Death Vessel in the planetarium. Free museum admission from 6 to 9 p.m. thanks to ConocoPhillips. Thomas Planetarium tickets extra.

 

Live in the Planetarium: Indie-Folk music with Joel Thibodeau performing as Death Vessel

7:30 p.m.

In his first Alaska performance, Death Vessel (Rhode Island-based guitarist and singer-songwriter Joel Thibodeau) performs solo arrangements accompanied by captivating visuals. $10, $8 for members.

 

Death Vessel has released three highly acclaimed albums with Sub Pop Records. Death Vessel’s most recent album, Island Intervals (2014), was recorded in Reykjavík by producer Alex Somers and features performance from Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós singer Jónsi. deathvessel.com/subpop.com/

 

Battle of the Breweries
6 to 9 p.m.
Lager beers are featured in Muse’s Battle of the Breweries: Silver Gulch Fairbanks Lager, Anchor Brewing California Lager and Kenai Peninsula Brewers Reserve. Muse restaurant offers a choice of three draft beer flights and an appetizer for $20. Ages 21 and older.

 

Free Film: Leviathan

6 p.m.

Directed by Andrey Zvyagintsev; Music by Phillip Glass; 2014; 2 hours, 20 minutes

In a Russian coastal town, Kolya is forced to fight the corrupt mayor when he is told that his house will be demolished. He recruits a lawyer friend to help, but the man's arrival brings further misfortune for Kolya and his family. This film coincides with the Polar Bear Garden exhibition on view through Sept. 17.

 

Lunch on the Lawn

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays June 6 through August 29

Live music and family activities on the museum lawn include outdoor science labs where participants may look through a solar telescope, complete an engineering challenge or watch a turtle tromp in the grass. Weekly activities vary. Brown bag it, or buy lunch from a local food truck. Weather dependent. Free.

 

Lunch and Learn Alaska: Mask and Story

Noon to 12:45 p.m. Thursday, June 8

Bring your lunch, and join Bethel-born Yup’ik-Inupiaq maskmaker and storyteller Jerry Silvauuq F. Lieb Jr. as he shares his stories and and demonstrates the art of making spirit masks, drums and carvings. Lunch and Learn Alaska short classes offer history and context around Alaska life. Each session combines the museum collection and exhibitions with local expertise. Learn a new skill and get a taste of Alaska. $7, members receive 10 percent discount.

 

Reality Bites: Deadliest Catch

5:30 p.m. Thursday, June 8

The first-season crew of the hit series Deadliest Catch join local filmmaker Mark Brinster in a panel discussion about the impact the show has had on television and Alaskan culture. Moderated by Alaska Dispatch News “Reality Check” columnist Emily Fehrenbacher. Included with admission.

 

Conversations in the Dome

6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 15

Watch a planetarium show followed by a discussion with Alaska history, science and culture experts ranging from bear biologists to aviation historians. Enter through 7th Avenue entrance. $10, members receive 10 percent discount.


Smithsonian Curator’s Tour

Noon to 1 p.m. Friday, June 16

Tour the Smithsonian Arctic Studies Center with an anthropologist and gain a better understanding of Alaska’s indigenous cultures through 600 Alaska Native artifacts. Learn about traditional life in Alaska’s diverse regions through clothing, tools, ceremonial objects and more. Curator-led tours are offered the third Friday of every month during the summer. Included with admission.

 

Blink: Creative Play

11:30 to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 20

Note: Blink shifts to a summer schedule, occurring once monthly on June 20, July 18, and Aug. 22 from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. during Lunch on the Lawn. Weekly Blink programming will return in the fall. 

Engage young children through open-ended play and hands-on activities in storytelling, art and science. Best for ages 5 and younger. Free.

 

Lunch on the Lawn: Solstice Celebration

11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 20

Celebrate the longest day of the year with an an extended Lunch on the Lawn and hands-on activities, food and music. Free. Food available for purchase.

 

Blink: Monument Building

11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Kids and adults take inspiration from Stonehenge and build their own structure honoring the sun. Blink engages children ages 5 and younger through open-ended play, storytelling, art and science.

 

Botanical Elixirs
12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Discover which plants thrive during Alaska’s long Alaska summers and learn about their healing properties through folklore and storytelling. Explore the process of making tinctures and essences. Alaska Botanical Gardens and spirit medium and lightweaver Vicki Butler of Red Hawk Oils and Crystals share expertise.

 

Power and Energy of Crystals
1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Learn how crystals form along with ideas about the energetic and metaphysical properties of specific stones. Museum staff and spirit medium and lightweaver Vicki Butler of Red Hawk Oils and Crystals share expertise.

 

Solar Energy
2:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Explore the power of the sun to energize the natural and built environment.

 

Urban Homestead 101: Food Preservation Through Fermentation

5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 20

Before harvesting this season’s bounty, learn methods for preserving Alaska proteins and foraged foods in this special solstice Urban Homestead class. Join Jeremy Umansky, an authority on koji and other fermentation techniques, a gastronomic scientist, forager and chef/owner of Larder: A Curated Delicatessen & Bakery in Cleveland. He will be joined by Stacie Miller, executive chef of McCarthy Lodge. $20, members receive a 10 percent discount.

 

Summer Solstice: Silent Disco

9 p.m. to midnight Tuesday, June 20

Celebrate the sun with a silent disco on the museum lawn. Competing DJs will spin dance music until the sun goes down. Event will be moved inside in the event of inclement weather. Food and drink for purchase. $20, members receive at 10 percent discount.

 

Lunch and Learn Alaska: Salmon
Noon to 12:45 p.m. Thursday, June 29

Bring lunch or purchase lunch from the atrium kiosk, and join Alaska experts as they share stories and knowledge about Alaska salmon. More than a food source, every aspect of the salmon is usable. Salmon skin is resilient and used to make wallets, belts and more. Lunch and Learn Alaska short sessions offer history and context around Alaska life. Each class combines the museum collection and exhibitions with local expertise. Learn a new skill and get a taste of Alaska. $7, members receive a 10 percent discount.

 

 

 

The following schedule is valid May 1 through June 30. Prices vary from $4 to $10 and do not include museum general admission (unless otherwise noted). Learn more and buy tickets at anchoragemuseum.org.

 

River of Bears

3:30 p.m. daily

Observe Alaska’s iconic brown bears as they nurture cubs, fish for salmon and play in their natural environment. This immersive, full-dome planetarium show plants you in the middle of the McNeil River State Game Sanctuary, where more than 100 brown bears congregate each summer to bulk up for the harsh winter. Learn how bears’ remarkable intelligence and instincts help them survive in the Alaska wilderness. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Living in the Age of Airplanes

4:30 p.m. daily

Watch a story about how the airplane has changed the world. Filmed in 18 countries across seven continents, Living in the Age of Airplanes renews appreciation for one of the most extraordinary and awe-inspiring aspects of the modern world. The film is produced and directed by Brian J. Terwilliger (One Six Right), narrated by Harrison Ford, and features an original score by Academy Award-winning composer James Horner. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Astronomy Photographer of the Year 2016

10:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 1 to May 20
10:30 a.m. daily, May 21 to June 30

Every year the Royal Observatory Greenwich runs an international competition called the Astronomy Photographer of the Year (APY). Sit back and watch as images from the 2016 competition fill the planetarium dome sparking imagination and interest in astronomy and photography. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Global Soundscapes

11:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 1 to May 20
11:30 a.m. daily, May 21 to June 30

Experience an ear-opening journey into the science of sound and the exciting new field of soundscape ecology. Experience basic acoustics through fun interactive activities and incredible slow-motion footage of pulsating musical instruments, vibrating vocal cords and raspberries. Learn how animal sounds occupy unique sonic niches in lush, orchestral soundscapes. Discover how soundscape ecology can be used to assess the biodiversity and health of global ecosystems. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Above Alaska

12:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 1 to May 20
12:30 p.m. daily, May 21 to June 30

See Alaska’s magnificent aurora borealis without the frostbite. Travel to Alaska’s remote forests and mountains to experience a night under the northern lights. Shot in vivid high-resolution 4k full-dome format, the presentation features some of the best Aurora displays shot from locations across the state during the past two years. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Totality

1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 1 to May 20
1:30 p.m. daily, May 21 to June 30

From lunar to total solar, this show is all about eclipses. Look back at how eclipses helped prove the theory of general relativity, and look forward to upcoming eclipses and where to see them. Witness what happens when caught in the shadow of the moon and the sun plunges into a total solar eclipse.

 

Above Alaska

2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, May 1 to May 20
2:30 p.m. daily, May 21 to June 30

See Alaska’s magnificent aurora borealis without the frostbite. Travel to Alaska’s remote forests and mountains to experience a night under the northern lights. Shot in vivid high-resolution 4k full-dome format, the presentation features some of the best Aurora displays shot from locations across the state during the past two years. $6 plus museum admission.

 

Friday Music in the Planetarium

 

Live in the Planetarium: Blevin Blectum
7:30 p.m. Friday, May 5
Enter the planetarium for a live performance of music and projection with Rhode Island-based electronic musician and multimedia artist Blevin Blectum. Combining sound, imagery and costume, Blevin Blectum creates performances that explore topics from science fiction to ornithology. $10, $8 for members

 

Blevin is half of the music group 'Blectum from Blechdom' with Kristin Grace Erickson, aka Kevin Blechdom, and a third of 'The Traveling Bubble Ensemble,' with Kelley Polar and Elise Kuder. She has performed and toured extensively since 1998, with releases on record labels Aagoo, Estuary Ltd., Tigerbeat6, DeluxeRecs, Praemedia, Vague Terrain, Phthalo and more. She holds degrees from Oberlin College/Conservatory, Mills College, and Brown University. Blevin designs and creates sound for toys at Hasbro in Providence, Rhode Island.

 

Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon 

7:30 p.m. Friday, May 12

Immerse yourself in Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon.” This new full-dome music and light show expands on the classic album through captivating HD graphics. Not a typical laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members.

 

Led Zeppelin Cosmic Light Show

7:30 p.m. Friday, May 26

Be transported by mood-altering art and 3-D graphics choreographed to Led Zeppelin’s biggest hits, including Whole Lotta Love, Immigrant Song and Ramble On. This immersive experience plays out on the museum's full-dome planetarium screen in concert with a state-of-the-art sound system. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members.

 

Live in the Planetarium: Indie-Folk music with Joel Thibodeau performing as Death Vessel

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 2

In his first Alaska performance, Death Vessel (Rhode Island-based guitarist and singer-songwriter Joel Thibodeau) performs solo arrangements accompanied by captivating visuals. $10, $8 for members.

 

Death Vessel has released three highly acclaimed albums with Sub Pop Records. Death Vessel’s most recent album, Island Intervals (2014), was recorded in Reykjavík by producer Alex Somers and features performance from Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós singer Jónsi. deathvessel.com/subpop.com

 

Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon 

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 9  

Immerse yourself in Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon.” This new full-dome music and light show expands on the classic album through captivating HD graphics. Not a typical laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members.

 

Led Zeppelin Cosmic Light Show

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 16

Be transported by mood-altering art and 3-D graphics choreographed to Led Zeppelin’s biggest hits, including Whole Lotta Love, Immigrant Song and Ramble On. This immersive experience plays out on the museum's full-dome planetarium screen in concert with a state-of-the-art sound system. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members.

 

Pink Floyd: The Wall 

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 23 
Lose yourself in Pink Floyd’s masterpiece “The Wall.” This full-dome music and light show interprets this classic album through mesmerizing HD graphics. This is not a laser show, but the next generation of computer generated imagery. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members. 

 

Led Zeppelin Cosmic Light Show

7:30 p.m. Friday, June 30

Be transported by mood-altering art and 3-D graphics choreographed to Led Zeppelin’s biggest hits, including Whole Lotta Love, Immigrant Song and Ramble On. This immersive experience plays out on the museum's full-dome planetarium screen in concert with a state-of-the-art sound system. Audience advisory: Adult subject matter. Please enter through the south entrance (7th Ave. between A St. and C St.). Doors close at 7:30 p.m. $10 per person/$8 members.

 

 

 

The Anchorage Museum offers a variety of classes for all ages and abilities. Find complete class listings and registration information at anchoragemuseum.org/learn.

 

Adult Art Class: Introduction to Oil Painting
10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 6

Through a combination of discussion, demonstration and painting, this class covers the various steps and techniques of oil painting. Learn how to stretch a canvas and what types of brushes are at the artist's disposal. Explore the history of pigments and mediums and multiple techniques of the art form. Participants will paint and take home a finished still-life painting, composed of the very same colors used by many of the “Old Masters” of the 16th and 17th centuries. Taught by local artist Karl Koett. Students are responsible for some supplies; see website for details. $100; members receive 10 percent discount.

 

Family Art Class: Spring Landscapes

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, May 20

Celebrate Spring in this collaborative family class. Children and parents will use painting and collage to create a unique spring landscape. Take inspiration from what is just outside the museum window and explore various drawing materials, water-based paint, and found images. Best for artists of all skill levels ages 5 and up. All supplies provided. Taught by local artist David Pettibone. $10 per registrant, members receive 10 percent discount.

 

 

CLASSES AND WORKSHOPS: JUNE

 

Adult Art Class: Landscape Painting
10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 3

Science and art both ask us to look closely at our world. Botanical illustration has been used for millennia to catalogue, and share a rich variety of plant species. Today, as the climate changes and ecosystems are in flux, botanical illustration has an important role in helping us look closely again at the natural world and communicate its complex beauty and detail. Participants will create their own botanical illustration and learn multiple watercolor techniques that illustrators have used over the centuries to accurately and, at the same time, beautifully depict various plant species. Taught by artist David Pettibone. Students responsible for supplies; see website for details. $100 per registrant, members receive 10 percent discount.
 

Family Art Class: Wildlife Painting

2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 17

Explore Alaska's diverse wildlife in this collaborative family class. Children and parents will create portraits of animals together using water-based paint and collage. Best for artists of all skill levels ages 5 and up. Taught by artist Karl Koett. All supplies provided. $10 per registrant, members receive 10 percent discount.

 

Summer Camps at the Anchorage Museum

From robotics and space exploration to costumes, animals and more, the Anchorage Museum has a camp topic to suit nearly every 7- to 12–year-old’s interest. Designed to foster imagination and experimentation in art, science and technology, campers learn, play and create through exploring museum objects and resources under the guidance of trained educators. Prices vary; members receive 10 percent discount.

 

Weeklong sessions start May 30 and end Aug. 11, 2017. Special daylong sessions are scheduled for May 29 and July 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7. Camp hours are from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with drop-off as early as 8 a.m. and pick-up as late as 4 p.m.

 

See https://www.anchoragemuseum.org/learn/summer-camps for summer camp offerings and to register. Register soon, these popular weeklong camps fill up fast. Questions? Email camps@anchoragemuseum.org or call 907-929-9276.

 

 

 

Ephemeral State by Lead Pencil Studio

Sept. 1 through Jan. 14, 2018

Ephemeral State is an exhibition by Lead Pencil Studio that explores the 3D capture capability of laser imaging, detection and ranging (LIDAR) technology. The exhibition will feature LIDAR-based physical objects all focused on the single subject of water in Alaska. The artwork is a reliquary of surfaces, models, videos and crystal prints.

 

Cruisin’ the Eternal Coastline

Sept. 15 through April 8, 2018

Cruisin’ the Eternal Coastline features fossils, paintings, hand-drawn maps, drawings, as well as light and audio installations by Alaska artist Ray Troll. The exhibition focuses on the vast span of geologic time and evolutionary history of the West Coast of North America, reaching from Baja, California to Utqiagvik, Alaska. With a focus on the population-rich areas of California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska, this exhibition is accessible to a broad range of audiences interested in what surrounds them in their everyday environments. The project is a collaborative effort that combines the art of Ray Troll and the science writing of Kirk Johnson, director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.

 

David Pettibone: Tree

Sept. 15 through Jan. 15, 2018

An installation in the museum atrium featuring a series of paintings and drawings by Alaska artist David Pettibone that depict a single Eagle River cottonwood tree documented throughout the course of a year. Created as part of a Polar Lab artist-in-residence project.

 

Alaska Exhibition

On view beginning Sept. 15

Alaska is a land of contrasts and extremes, a complex social and natural landscape that lends itself to myth and cliché. The Alaska exhibition tells this story of Alaska through multiple voices and perspectives reflecting the ingenuity, technology, ways of knowing and intimate understanding of the landscape that have allowed people to survive and thrive across the North. The exhibition is organized by 11 themes reflecting essential aspects of life in Alaska, both today and throughout the state’s rich history. These themes reveal the identity of Alaska and its people. On view are more than 400 objects from the Anchorage Museum’s collections, including several acquired or on loan especially for this new exhibition. Visitors will experience immersive installations throughout the exhibition with elements of sculpture, video and interactivity, soundscapes, moving images and cinematic narratives with participative moments. The visitor journey follows an intuitive clockwise path that begins and ends at the same point. Visitors move forward in time, exploring themes and absorbing Alaska’s history as it relates to contemporary issues. At the heart of the gallery is a central space for hosting artists and performances, welcoming school groups, conducting readings, engaging in storytelling, and gathering for events. Visitors may also explore a complementary gallery for temporary exhibitions related to Northern narratives, which opened this past May. Together, these elements invite visitors to consider for themselves what Alaska really is: what is real, what is myth, and what lives in that place in between.
 

Art of the North Exhibition

On view beginning Sept. 15

The Art of the North galleries in the Museum’s new wing present the museum’s art collection from the perspectives of American art and an international North. Paintings, sculpture, photography, video and other media offer varied perceptions of Northern landscape and wilderness through historical and contemporary depictions of both land and people. These new galleries deliver a compelling narrative for the North. Presented are documentary works from expedition artists along with Romantic landscapes by 19th and 20th century painters and works by contemporary artists for whom landscape is shown as place in transition, at risk and altered by man. The indigenous perspective is critical to portraying the North. Museums have long segregated indigenous artwork from other traditional, modern and contemporary works. With this installation, the two will be combined into one narrative of the North. The Rasmuson Wing expands the amount of space dedicated to the museum’s collection from 3,000 to 25,000-square-feet. Combined, these spaces will put on view approximately 200 works from the permanent collection. 

 

The Art of Fandom

On view Oct. 13 through Feb. 4, 2018

This all-ages exhibition explores the things people like in our mass and global culture through collectables, contemporary art and fandom sub-culture. Included are anime, manga and Japanese-inspired culture, comic books and graphic novels, literature and television fandom, furry fandom, music and real-person fandom. This is an international exhibition, with artists from Japan, Australia, Canada, Netherlands, United Kingdom, and United States. Some of the participating artists include Sebastian Musada, Red Hong Yi, Cliff Wright, Marco d’Alfonso and others.

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

 

Exhibitions are included with museum admission unless otherwise noted.

 

Art of the North Preview Exhibition

May 1 through Sept. 1, 2017

A preview of objects and paintings from the museum’s collection will be on view this summer in the Northern Narratives East Gallery, located adjacent to the future Alaska Exhibition that will open in mid-September. The Northern Narratives East Gallery is a new gallery space that will highlight ideas and exhibitions that examine Alaska and the North, complementing and exploring subjects that are part of the new Alaska Exhibition.

 

Slow

May 5 through Sept. 1

Slow TV (Sakte-TV in Norwegian) is a term used for a genre of live "marathon" television coverage of an ordinary event in its complete length. Its name is derived both from the long endurance of the broadcast and the natural slow pace of the program's progress. It was popularized in the last decade by the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation (NRK), beginning with the broadcast of a 7-hour train journey in 2009. Slow TV has become widely popular in Norway – so much so that the BBC and Netflix have adopted the programming.
 

I Am Inuit

On view Feb. 24 through Sept. 17

For the people who reside there, Alaska’s Arctic isn’t a curiosity, a wasteland or an untouched wilderness – it is home. The human dimension of the Arctic is the focus of I Am Inuit, a project launched in July 2015, by the Inuit Circumpolar Council-Alaska that connects people with the Arctic through a shared humanity. This exhibition features the photographs of Anchorage-based Iñupiaq photographer Brian Adams. Adams travels to Inuit communities throughout the Alaskan Arctic to capture Inuit (Iñupiaq, Yup’ik, Cup’ik and St. Lawrence Island Yupik) life and culture.

 

Polar Bear Garden

On view March 3 through Sept. 17

Alaska and Russia are intimately connected by land and history, but also distant, separated by water, language, war and politics. Ridiculed by Congress and the press as Seward’s “ice box” and President Andrew Johnson’s “polar bear garden,” the 1867 purchase of Alaska from Russia was controversial at the time. Today, ice, ambition, oil and commerce continue to define the complex relationship between Alaska and Russia. Talk abounds of Russia claiming for itself both Alaska and Crimea; of a bold Russian-led transcontinental railway project linking Siberia with North America; and of traversing the Bering Strait through what could become the world’s longest tunnel. Alaska and Russia's northern regions share more than propaganda; they are known for record cold, fur, ice cream, huskies and the hardiest and most adaptable people. Objects in the exhibition include the historic treaty and the purchase check. Archival and contemporary photographs combine with cartoons, feature-length films, and Cold War propaganda to take viewers on a journey between Alaska and Russia since the purchase — exploring stereotypes, language, storytelling, boundaries and crossings.

 

Conservation Lab

On view through July 31

While the Alaska galleries undergo renovation, the museum has transformed its first-floor galleries into visible storage and a conservation lab. Visitors are able to see what’s normally behind-the-scenes, learn about the new Alaska and Art of the North exhibitions opening fall 2017, and have the opportunity to discuss objects in the museum’s collection.

 

 

 

Systems of Post-Secondary Education and Training
Cook Inlet Historical Society Lecture Series
Speaker: Will Jacobs, Professor Emeritus, History and Political Science Departments, University of Alaska Anchorage

7 p.m. Thursday, May 18
Author of Becoming UAA: 1954-2014, Will Jacobs will discuss the history of higher education in Anchorage. This will include the transition from an affiliate of the larger institution in Fairbanks, to a separately accredited community college, then a senior college, and finally a merger that led to the present institution we know at the University of Alaska Anchorage. Jacobs will also discuss the role that Alaska Pacific University has played in the city’s history. Held in the Anchorage Museum Auditorium (enter through 121 W. 7th Ave. entrance).

 

Nostalgia Lecture Series

Alaska Design Forum

Speaker: Joel Salatin
7 p.m. Monday, May 1
While most Americans seem to think our techno-glitzy, disconnected, celebrity-worshipping culture will be the first to sail off into a Star Trek future unencumbered by ecological umbilicals, Salatin bets that the future will instead incorporate more tried and true realities from the past. Both sobering and inspiring, this performance empowers people to tackle the seemingly impossibly large tasks that confront our generation. Historical contexts create jump-off points for a future as bright as our imagination and as sure as the past. There will be related workshops in each lecture city. Purchase tickets at http://alaskadesignforum.org/nostalgia/joel-salatin/. Held in the Anchorage Museum Auditorium (enter through 121 W. 7th Ave. entrance).

 

23rd Annual John Bagoy Memorial Cemetery Tour

Cook Inlet Historical Society Lecture Series
Hosted by Audrey and Bruce Kelly 

7 p.m. Wednesday, June 21
Following annual tradition, Audrey and Bruce Kelly will select ten grave sites of prominent residents buried at the Cemetery for a fascinating historical review of our community in a different era. There will be a printed souvenir brochure. Please enter the Anchorage Memorial Park Cemetery at the Bagoy Gate—7th and Cordova Streets.

 

 

 

The Anchorage Museum’s mission is to connect people, expand perspectives and encourage global dialogue about the North and its distinct environment.

 

SUMMER HOURS

Museum

May 1 through Sept. 30

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily

 

Museum Store and Atrium Cafe

Open during museum hours

 

Muse Restaurant

Saturday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Friday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

 

WINTER HOURS

Museum

Oct. 1 through April 30

10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday

Noon to 6 p.m. Sunday

Closed Monday

 

Polar Nights

Special programming from 6 to 9 p.m. Fridays, October through April

Free or discounted museum admission

 

GENERAL ADMISSION

Free for museum members, $15 adults (18-64), $12 Alaska resident adults (18-64), $10 military/senior citizens/students, $7 ages 3 to 12, free ages 2 and younger. Visitors can find general museum information at 907-929-9200 or anchoragemuseum.org.

 

Visitors with disabilities who need special assistance may call 907-929-9254.

 

Public parking is available in the underground garage on evenings and weekends. Handicap parking available daily. Fees payable at garage paybox.

 

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