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Alaska Fish Notes August 19, 2016


Published:

Top Stories.  Pinks lagging statewide … New policy on National Standard 2 (science) …  Summer reading –Board of Fish Proposals …  Will Silver Bay build more plants? …  USCG and SeaShare team up to distribute halibut … UW studies sockeye.

2016 Preliminary Alaska Commercial Salmon Harvest - Blue Sheet

The Alaska Fisheries Report (8/18).  download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1 Coming up this week, they’re processing fish in Petersburg, people are wondering if the streams are too hot for salmon in Wrangell, and just how many salmon do you think they’ve caught in 125 of fishing in Bristol Bay? We had help from KFSK’s Abbey Collins in Petersburg, KSTK’s Aaron Bolton in Wrangell, KDLG’s Dave Bendinger in Dillingham, and the Historic Cannery Initiative’s Anjuli Grantham in Kodiak.

Seafood Harvesters of America Recruiting New Executive Director  Apps due Sep 8.

Table of Contents

FEDERAL

1.      Unalaska Fisheries Report: 8/12/16

2.      NMFS National Standard 2 (Scientific Information) Regional Review (8/16)

3.      NMFS List of Fisheries for 2017 (MMPA) (8/15)

4.      Proposed Naval training causes concern (8/15)

5.      Pew.  Mapping Governance Gaps on the High Seas (8/17)

6.      Coast Guard suspends search for missing fisherman, Arnold Skeek (8/16)

7.      Coast Guard rescues crewmember injured when vessels collide (8/16)

8.      USCG - auto-pilot induced casualties (8/16)

9.      USCG - CFSAC members sought (8/19)

10.  Nonprofit Delivers Halibut to Communities in Alaska (8/16)

11.  Alaskan restrictions help Yukon kings meet Canadian goals (8/17)

12.  Ninilchik tribe finishes Kenai subsistence season (8/17)

13.  Southeast tribes voice mining concerns to State Department (8/17)

14.  NOAA surveyors in Dutch Harbor for chart updates (8/18)

15.  NPFMC.  August 10 Mailing

16.  FAO.  State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture
STATE

17.  Togiak sockeye are late, again (8/12)

18.  Plans for flash-freezing fish facility on Spit move forward (8/11)

19.  Preserving the history of Alaska’s canned seafood (8/15)

20.  No Damage To Local Fish Plant After Fire In False Pass (8/16)

21.  Managers statewide mystified by poor production of pink salmon (8/17)

22.  Alaska’s Pink Salmon Numbers Way Down (8/17)

23.  SE Seiners turn in early after weak pink harvest (8/18)

24.  Alaska Board of Fisheries Proposals Online (8/17)

25.  Sockeye Concerns Spark Two Proposals That Could Restrict Salmon Fishing Around Unalaska (8/18)

26.  Wrangell’s marine service center, 10 years of success (8/18)
MARKETING

27.  Why Alaskan Cod Might Not Actually Be From Alaska (8/13)

28.  Hold the Salmon, How About Scup? For Sustainable Seafood, Variety is Key (8/12)

29.  Bregal not ruling out taking American Seafoods into other species, downstream (8/8)

30.  Silver Bay could build three more plants in next five years (8/15)

31.  How To Create Sustainable Seafood (8/14)

32.  USDA Purchase Summary – 216,000 Pounds Frozen Salmon Fillets (8/15)

33.  Top 10 U.S. Salmon Cities Named in Honor of 2016 “National Salmon Day” (8/17)

34.  MSC certified sustainable seafood now in Colorado restaurants (8/18)

35.  Copper River Coho Salmon Season Kicks Off in Alaska (8/19)
SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY

36.  Long in the tooth: Greenland shark named longest-living vertebrate (8/12)

37.  NY Times.  Is That Real Tuna in Your Sushi? Now, a Way to Track That Fish (8/13)

38.  Arctic fish populations changing as ice dwindles, report says (8/13)

39.  Saildrones track fur seals over Pribilofs (8/12)

40.  Watershed Coalition tracks salmon stream temp trends (8/12)

41.  Sea Pact Announces 2016 Request for Grant Proposals (8/16)

42.  Factors affecting whale detection from large ships in Alaska with implications for whale avoidance (6/15)

43.  NPR.  What Does It Take To Map A Walrus Hangout? 160 Years And A Lot Of Help (8/17)

44.   Pollock Conservation Cooperative Research Center Letters of Interest are due Sept 26

45.   NOAA awards $5.4 million in grants for endangered, threatened species recovery.  Opens call for proposals for 2017 funding (8/17)

46.  Flotsam and Fliegenklatsche: Sitka a beachcomber’s paradise (8/17)

47.  Fish oil is America's preferred supplement — but does it even work? (8/17)

48.  El Nino is out. Will La Nina follow? (8/18)

49.  Got a minute? Check out this short video about the Alaska Salmon Program! (8/17)

50.  Studying sockeye salmon (8/17)

51.  Low-Powered LED Lights Can Improve Snow Crab Catchability (8/11)

52.  Wärtsilä Designs New Efficient Stern Trawler (8/16)

53.  The man who would map the ocean (8/18)

54.  Researchers Developing Cheaper, Faster Monitoring Method for PSP (8/19)

55.  Pacific sea level predicts global temperature changes (8/18)

56.  Alaska Sea Grant Bookstore:  Climate Change and Alaska Fisheries (2016)
MISC

57.  Asia Minute: Fewer Chinese Fishing Boats? (8/16)

58.  Garvey Schubert Barer.  50 Years of Maritime Law (8/1)

59.  Corn, soybeans and salmon? (8/17)

FEDERAL

1.       Unalaska Fisheries Report: 8/12/16.  Frank shares updates on the food and bait fishery, the golden king crab harvest, and more.  KUCB Audio

2.       NMFS National Standard 2 (Scientific Information) Regional Review (8/16).  Notice that NMFS is providing the regional peer review processes established pursuant to the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act. This notice provides a summary of each regional peer review process which has been established by the Secretary and the relevant regional fishery management council. Effective August 16, 2016.  81 FR 54561

3.      NMFS List of Fisheries for 2017 (MMPA) (8/15).  NMFS publishes its proposed List of Fisheries (LOF) for 2017, as required by the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The proposed LOF for 2017 reflects new information on interactions between commercial fisheries and marine mammals. Comment period through September 14, 2016.  81 FR 54019  NMFS proposes to reclassify the AK miscellaneous finfish handline/hand troll and mechanical jig fishery from Category III to Category II.

4.      Proposed Naval training causes concern (8/15).  Homer City Council passed a resolution on August 8, formally requesting changes to US Navy training exercises in the Gulf of Alaska. The proposed training area is 24 nautical miles from the Kenai Peninsula shoreline, just south of Prince William Sound and east of Kodiak Island. It covers over 59,000 square miles, an area slightly larger than the state of Georgia. More/KBBI Audio

Russia’s Pacific Fleet to Hold ‘Dozens of Large-Scale Exercises’ This Summer (6/3)

5.      Pew.  Mapping Governance Gaps on the High Seas (8/17).  A patchwork of international bodies and treaties manage ocean resources and human activity in areas beyond any state’s national jurisdiction (see Table 1). However, these governance bodies vary greatly in terms of their mandate, which determines their geographic scope, their objective, the legally binding nature of decisions they adopt, and whether they regulate one or several activities. Their jurisdictions often overlap, but virtually no mechanisms exist to coordinate across geographic areas and sectors.1 Too often, this piecemeal governance approach leads to the degradation of the environment and its resources, and makes deploying management and conservation tools such as environmental impact assessments and marine protected areas (MPAs), including marine reserves, challenging both legally and logistically.2     More

6.      Coast Guard suspends search for missing fisherman, Arnold Skeek (8/16).  The Coast Guard stopped looking for Arnold Skeek, the missing 27-year-old fisherman from Kake, early Monday afternoon. Authorities believe he fell from the Beaufort Sea, 60-foot fishing tender, into Auke Bay on Sunday.  More/KTOO Audio

7.      Coast Guard rescues crewmember injured when vessels collide (8/16).  A U.S. Coast Guard Jayhawk helicopter in the midst of training exercises in the Cordova area diverted on Aug. 16 to rescue a crewmember aboard a fishing vessel involved in a collision with a second fishing vessel.

Petty Officer Jon-Paul Rios said that the collision between the F/V Chugach Pearl and F/V Temptation occurred in the area of Culross Island, about 17 nautical miles east of Whittier.

A rescue swimmer lowered from the Coast Guard helicopter assessed the condition of the injured crewmember, who was struck by an exhaust stack during the collision, and determined the need for a medevac.  More

8.      USCG - auto-pilot induced casualties (8/16).  The US Coast Guard issued an alert reminding mariners of the dangers of over-reliance on auto-pilot systems. Safety Alert 10-16  Courtesy Bryant’s Maritime Blog

The Iron Mike strikes again (8/18)

9.      USCG - CFSAC members sought (8/19).  The US Coast Guard seeks applications for membership on the Commercial Fishing Safety Advisory Committee (CFSAC). Applications should be received by 18 October. 81 Fed. Reg. 55469

10.  Nonprofit Delivers Halibut to Communities in Alaska (8/16).  A Washington-based nonprofit that takes unintended catch from Alaska trawl fisheries and donates it to all 50 states just completed its fifth mission flying the fish from Kodiak to Kotzebue. This is also the second year they’ve transported donations to Nome. Volunteers distribute the boxes comprised of bycatch and incidentally caught fish to nearby communities in order to supplement local diets.  More/KMXT Audio

Jim Harmon, executive director of SeaShare. Kayla Desroches/KMXTJim Harmon, executive director of SeaShare.
Kayla Desroches/KMXT

11.  Alaskan restrictions help Yukon kings meet Canadian goals (8/17).  For the second year running, Yukon River chinook salmon seem to be climbing out of an abundance pit.

The river is home to a bulk of Alaska’s subsistence communities that suffered from a statewide decline in king salmon, the staple subsistence harvest, since the early 2000s. Historically, the river sees an average return of 300,000 fish, but that hasn’t been seen since 1997. The most recent five-year average is less than half at 126,000 king salmon.  More

12.  Ninilchik tribe finishes Kenai subsistence season (8/17).  The heads of passing boaters swiveled toward the bank, curious to see the only subsistence gillnet allowed in the Kenai River.

The Ninilchik Traditional Council’s subsistence gillnet takes up about 30 feet of bank. The net swayed in the strong current, bucking when a fish struck the mesh. Though the gear made it in the water this season, whether it will make its way through the regulatory process next year is unclear yet.

“Seeing any rainbows?” a boater called out to the tribal staff near the net as his boat passed.

“None!” called back Daniel Reynolds, one of the designated fishers for the tribe. “Just reds.”  More

Ninilchik Tribe Reports Catch from Kenai (8/18).  Tribal officials say designated fishers harvested 723 sockeye, six pinks and 12 coho between July 28 and Aug. 15.

13.  Southeast tribes voice mining concerns to State Department (8/17).  Southeast tribal groups met with officials from the Department of State and the Environmental Protection Agency last week in Juneau and Ketchikan to discuss ongoing issues with Canadian mining projects on Southeast Alaska watersheds.  More

14.  NOAA surveyors in Dutch Harbor for chart updates (8/18).  A two-for-one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration survey mission in Alaskan waters has small boats surveying approaches to the port of Dutch Harbor to update new charts for shipping safety.

The 231’x42’x15’6” NOAA survey ship Fairweather departed Dutch Harbor Aug. 9 for its FISHPAC offshore acoustic survey mission, running sonar along some 4,000 nautical miles. In addition to mapping fish habitat, the sonar will contribute soundings data to NOAA’s Institute of Coast Survey for new charts – a pressing need in the high latitudes where some areas have not been surveyed in many decades.  More

15.  NPFMC.  August 10 Mailing
Thank you Letter from Kodiak Borough & City of Kodiak to NPFMC
New England Observer Program Funding Order – Favorable Decision
IARPC Arctic Research Plan 2017 – 2021
Fisheries Allocation Review Policy (Policy Directive)
Criteria for Initiating Fisheries Allocation Reviews – Guidance Document (Procedural Directive)
Recommended Practices and Factors to Consider – Making Allocation Decisions (Procedural Directive)

16.  FAO.  State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture. The State of World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA) is the flagship publication of the FAO Fisheries and Aquaculture Department. This premier advocacy document is published every two years to provide policy-makers, civil society and those whose livelihoods depend on the sector a comprehensive, objective and global view of capture fisheries and aquaculture, including associated policy issues.   SOFIA 2016

STATE

17.  Togiak sockeye are late, again (8/12).  Fishing in much of Bristol Bay has wound down, but sockeye activity in the fishery's smallest district continued after activity elsewhere tapered off.

Despite a slightly later start than usual, by Aug. 8 Alaska Department of Fish and Game's Westside management biologist Tim Sands said the Togiak District has been looking good this summer.

The total harvest through mid-August was about 593,000, greater than the pre-season forecast of 440,000.  More

18.  Plans for flash-freezing fish facility on Spit move forward (8/11).  A nonprofit company planning to use flash-freezing technology to create seafood products not only in Homer but in villages across Alaska has applied for a 20-year lease for two lots on the Homer Spit at the corner of Fish Dock Road.

City Manager Katie Koester briefed the council on new developments with Global Sustainable Seafoods of Alaska, which has been discussing its plans with the city for some time now. The company plans to build a prototype for its flash-freezing seafood program in Homer, then build similar units for installation in rural Alaska villages throughout the state. People from the villages will be brought to Homer and trained in how to use the modular flash-freezing equipment, said Koester.  Moe

19.  Preserving the history of Alaska’s canned seafood (8/15).  There used to be hundreds of seafood canneries all along Alaska’s coastline. Two people are involved in documenting and preserving some of that rich history in order to share it with others.  More/KFSK Audio

20.  No Damage To Local Fish Plant After Fire In False Pass (8/16).  Officials are investigating a fire that broke out in False Pass over the weekend near a local fish processing plant.

The blaze began on Saturday around 4 a.m. in the machine shop of Bering Pacific Seafoods. That's according to a press release from the Aleutian Pribilof Island Community Development Association, which owns and operates the company.  More

21.   Managers statewide mystified by poor production of pink salmon (8/17).  Weather patterns contributed to a screwy sockeye run in 2015, and this year the same is happening to pinks, the second-largest salmon harvest in Alaska.

In 2016, commercial fishermen have only harvested 8 million pinks as of Aug. 15 in Prince William Sound, the state’s largest pink run. Only one-third are hatchery fish, a marked turn from last years’ massive pink haul of 96 million in the Sound, a 20-year record-breaker over 93 million pinks in 2003. Of these, 80 percent were hatchery fish.

Southeast Alaska’s run is doing as badly with only 13.4 million harvested, less than half the already-substandard forecast of 34 million fish.  More

22.   Alaska’s Pink Salmon Numbers Way Down (8/17).  Alaska salmon harvests reached the 99 million fish mark through Aug. 16, with the preliminary harvest of 52 million sockeyes exceeding a forecast of 47.7 million reds, while the 33 million pinks caught was far below the forecast of 90 million humpies.

The humpies, said a spokesman for one major processor, are big, but the numbers are way down. Even for an even numbered year, when the harvest of pink salmon traditionally falls far below odd numbered year harvests, this harvest is looking to be one of the worst humpy harvests in years.  More

23.  SE Seiners turn in early after weak pink harvest (8/18).  The pink salmon season in Southeast is supposed to be peaking right now. Instead, the run is actually slowing, harvests have been poor, and as KFSK’s Abbey Collins reports from Petersburg, many fishermen are wrapping up the season early.  The F/V Marathon is docked in Petersburg’s South Harbor.

“We’re done.”

That’s Jesse Agner, a crewmember on the boat. Out of the 12 years he’s been seining he says this is one of the worst he’s ever seen.  More/KFSK Audio

24.  Alaska Board of Fisheries Proposals Online (8/17).  A total of 276 proposals up for consideration by the Alaska Board of Fisheries during its 2016-2017 meeting cycle are now online in the state board’s proposal book at http://www.boardoffisheries.adfg.alaska.gov.

They may be downloaded individually, or in sections or for entire meetings from that website. A total of 46 proposals are online for the Lower Cook Inlet finish meeting, to be held Nov. 30 through Dec. 3 at the Alaska Islands and Oceans Visitor’s Center in Homer, including amendments to the Cook Inlet sablefish management plan and Cook Inlet rockfish management plan, both from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game.  More

25.  Sockeye Concerns Spark Two Proposals That Could Restrict Salmon Fishing Around Unalaska (8/18).  Unalaskans are worried about the sockeye salmon run at Front Beach — thanks to a growing number of nets and seemingly fewer fish.

That's why the Unalaska/Dutch Harbor Fish and Game Advisory Committee has proposed a new regulation aimed at conserving reds.  More

26.  Wrangell’s marine service center, 10 years of success (8/18).  Wrangell has been reinventing itself as a maritime community since the collapse of the timber industry in the early ‘90s. In November 2006, the community’s marine service center lifted its first boat out of the water. Now, 10 years later, more than 2,000 boats have been hauled out, and Wrangell’s boatyard keeps piling on the reasons for its success.  More

MARKETING

27.  Why Alaskan Cod Might Not Actually Be From Alaska (8/13).  Germany's favorite fish isn't always caught off the Alaskan coast. U.S. fishermen want transparency for consumers. But such a move could upend the fishing industry.

BERLIN — Captain Timothy Thomas, an American, trawls for Alaskan pollock, a type of cod fish loved by Germans, off the Alaskan coast in the northeast Pacific.

His vehicle is a 103-meter-long ship called "Northern Jaeger" that can fit a crew of 135 and swish by at 26 kilometers per hour.

The Northern Jaeger catches 150 tons of pollock everyday with strict specifications — each fish has to be at least 3 years old and weigh at least 700 grams — while battling waves that Thomas says can be as high as skyscrapers for several weeks of the year.  More

28.  Hold the Salmon, How About Scup? For Sustainable Seafood, Variety is Key (8/12).  This article was originally written for Carnegie Council's Policy Innovations digital magazine. 

In February 2015, 49 health and environmental advocacy groups in the United States urged the federal government to incorporate environmental sustainability into the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

Included in their letter was an emphasis on sustainable seafood. They wrote: "Often ignored, seafood consumption is another key dietary component in which health and sustainability go hand in hand. Aquatic animals lower on the food chain have lower levels of bioaccumulated contaminants and are a more sustainable choice than larger aquatic animals, which have undergone drastic population decline. The next iteration of the Dietary Guidelines should therefore advise consumers to eat products lower on the aquatic food chain and to choose species that are not associated with harmful fishing or farming practices."  More

29.  Bregal not ruling out taking American Seafoods into other species, downstream (8/8). It’s been a year since a deal was struck to steer major pollock and Pacific cod harvester American Seafoods past a nearly $1 billion debt pile and tough times for pollock producers. But things are now looking up for the company, investor Scott Perekslis told Undercurrent News.

“We’re having a very good year with American Seafoods. We’re seeing a lot of success in our fishing operations and managing our cost base," he said. "That’s the business where there’s more than one way to skin the cat and the market has definitely stabilized from where it was but aside from that there’s ways for us to enhance profitability from better execution and better management."  More

30.   Silver Bay could build three more plants in next five years (8/15).  US processor Silver Bay Seafoods is planning to build several new plants in the coming years as it expands in salmon, squid, pelagics and possibly other species, said its chief financial officer.

The Sitka, Alaska-based company, which operates six plants in Alaska and is planning another in California, has been investing in its operations over the past year, completing a new plant in Valdez in the spring of this year, which is now in operation.  More

31.   How To Create Sustainable Seafood (8/14).  Chef and author Barton Seaver, director of the Sustainable Seafood and Health Initiative at Harvard University, talks about sustainable seafood and the promise of farmed fish and aquaculture.  More

32.   USDA Purchase Summary – 216,000 Pounds Frozen Salmon Fillets (8/15).  Ocean Beauty -- $1,542,960

33.   Top 10 U.S. Salmon Cities Named in Honor of 2016 “National Salmon Day” (8/17).  Hold the top sirloin, fried chicken and BBQ. An analysis by one of the world’s largest providers of shelf-stable seafood suggests that residents of a number of noncoastal cities known for their traditional meat-eating ways may actually prefer salmon.  More

34.  MSC certified sustainable seafood now in Colorado restaurants (8/18).  Denver restaurants Bamboo Sushi, To the Wind Bistro and Pub 17 on Welton Street, together with Boulder's Wild Standard and Vail's Terra Bistro, have become the firsts in Colorado to serve Marine Stewardship Council certified seafood and display the blue MSC ecolabel. Coloradans now have five convenient dining options for discovering and experiencing MSC certified sustainable seafood.

The blue MSC ecolabel assures consumers that the fish they are enjoying comes from a sustainable and well-managed fishery that has been independently certified, ensuring that fish populations, and the ecosystems upon which they depend, remain healthy and productive. Each supplied by Colorado-based Seattle Fish Co., the independent restaurants are artfully preparing a variety of MSC certified seafood options for their customers to enjoy, knowing there will be plenty more for tomorrow.   Link   
   

35.  Copper River Coho Salmon Season Kicks Off in Alaska (8/19).  Fishermen of the Copper River flats celebrated the official start of Copper River coho salmon season on August 15. Setting their nets in tumultuous ocean swell, they were rewarded with bright and beautiful Copper River coho salmon.  More


SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY

36.  Long in the tooth: Greenland shark named longest-living vertebrate (8/12).  Greenland sharks, which live an average of at least 272 years, rank as the longest-lived vertebrates on Earth, a new study indicates; they may live beyond 400 years. The joys of a long life are surely countless, but there's one small hitch: These sharks do not achieve sexual maturity until 150 or so. These natives of the North Atlantic Ocean can grow to be 21 feet long and 2,000 pounds. Blind due to the many parasites crowding their eyes, these sharks are said to have an impeccable sense of smell, which they make ample use of when they hunt.  More

37.  NY Times.  Is That Real Tuna in Your Sushi? Now, a Way to Track That Fish (8/13)  

38.  Arctic fish populations changing as ice dwindles, report says (8/13).  Pacific cod, walleye pollock and some types of salmon have been found in more areas of U.S. Arctic waters, and sleeper sharks are now established there, according to a new report released by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management.

In all, 109 species of marine fishes have been identified in the Chukchi and Beaufort seas, and 20 are new to the list, according to the report, first posted on the USGS website Monday. Another 63 species have changed their ranges from what was previously documented, according to the report.  More

39.  Saildrones track fur seals over Pribilofs (8/12).  The saildrones might help explain the plummeting population of northern fur seals in the Pribilof Islands.

The northern fur seal population on the Pribilof Islands, Alaska has been experiencing an unexplained decline since the mid-1970s. This despite it being one of the most studied marine mammals, according to National Marine Fisheries Service spokeswoman Marjorie Mooney-Seus. ?The fur seals are being tracked this summer with Saildrones, unmanned, solar and windpowered boats that departed Unalaska/Dutch Harbor in May.  More

40.  Watershed Coalition tracks salmon stream temp trends (8/12).  The Southeast Alaska Watershed Coalition plans to record the temperature of salmon streams across Southeast Alaska over the next two years. The project aims to collect the data to measure climate change’s affect on Alaska’s most prominent fish.

Salmon are a very particular fish. All five species arrive in streams to spawn every year, leaving behind eggs, which turn into fry the next spring and eventually smolt before going out to sea. Each species has a timed lifecycle with many factors affecting future populations, stream temperatures being among them.  More 

41.  Sea Pact Announces 2016 Request for Grant Proposals (8/16).  Sea Pact, an innovative alliance of seafood industry leaders, announced the opening of its request for grant proposals (RFP), the fifth time the group has opened up applications for worthwhile projects.

Sea Pact is a group of leading North American seafood companies dedicated to driving stewardship and continuous improvement of social, economic, and environmental responsibility throughout the global seafood supply chain. The group achieves these goals in part by using its collective power to advance environmentally sustainable fisheries and aquaculture practices and provide the building blocks of a long term and sustainable seafood industry by financially contributing to improve the fishing and fish farming systems from which they procure.  More

42.  Factors affecting whale detection from large ships in Alaska with implications for whale avoidance (6/15).  In response to growing concern over lethal ship−whale collisions, a number of efforts have been developed intended to enhance the ability of ships to avoid whales. However, the effectiveness of avoidance by large ships dep​ends upon the ships detecting whales at a distance sufficient to allow for an appropriate avoidance measure. Here we explore the issue of whale detection using over 3000 unique detections of humpback whales recorded by observers stationed aboard large cruise ships in Alaska, USA.  More

43.  NPR.  What Does It Take To Map A Walrus Hangout? 160 Years And A Lot Of Help (8/17).  In 1874, when the painter and naturalist Henry Wood Elliott was observing a small crowd of walruses on the Punuk Islands off Alaska's coast, he was preoccupied with the appearance of their pustules and the precise texture of their skins.

"The longer I looked at them the more heightened was my disgust; for they resembled distorted, mortified, shapeless masses of flesh," he wrote. Almost off-handedly, he noted their number — around 150, all male — before pondering their resemblance to "so many gnomes or demons of fairy romance."  More

[Chart]Source: NPR analysis of the Pacific Walrus Coastal Haulout Database, 1852-2016 (U.S. Geological Survey).  Credit: Lisa Charlotte Rost/NPR

 

44.  Pollock Conservation Cooperative Research Center Letters of Interest are due Sept 26.  Click here for details on how to apply and all other relevant information.

 

45.  NOAA awards $5.4 million in grants for endangered, threatened species recovery.  Opens call for proposals for 2017 funding (8/17).  NOAA has awarded $5.4 million in grants to states and tribes in all coastal regions to help in the recovery of endangered and threatened marine species. The agency also opened a call for 2017 proposals under the Species Recovery Grants Program, authorized under Section 6 of the Endangered Species Act. http://www.noaa.gov/media-release/noaa-awards-54-million-in-grants-for-endangered-threatened-species-recovery 

46.  Flotsam and Fliegenklatsche: Sitka a beachcomber’s paradise (8/17).  Oceanographer Curtis Ebbesmeyer is the author of Flotsametrics and the Floating World, and the publisher of the ‘Beachcomber’s Alert.” During a 1-hour call-in show on KCAW on Tuesday, August 16, 2016, Ebbesmeyer explained the origins of floating ocean debris — everything from US Naval sonobuoys to dangerous Fliegenklatsche (aka fly swatters!). With Sitka ultra-combers Tyler and Dean Orbison. Hosted by KCAW’s Robert Woolsey.  KCAW Audio (1 hour)

47.  Fish oil is America's preferred supplement — but does it even work? (8/17).  A wild-caught, fatty fish is one of the most healthy things people can eat, nutritionists say. The evidence on the briny wonders of fish-oil supplements, however, seems to come and go with the tide.

For every study touting fish oil as a remedy for anxiety, arthritis or heart health, another shows no benefit — and occasionally, even harm — from supplementing one's diet with oil pressed out of anchovies and sardines. (Sorry, but no, manufacturers aren't filling capsules with oil from free-range Alaskan sockeye.)  More

48.  El Nino is out. Will La Nina follow? (8/18).  One of the strongest El Ninos on record ended in May. A strong La Nina would normally follow. But that isn’t a sure bet this time around.

Brian Brettschneider is a climatologist in Anchorage who closely tracks Alaska climate data and trends. Alaska’s Energy Desk is checking in with him regularly as part of a new segment- Ask a Climatologist.

He says both El Nino and La Nina can have a significant impact on winter temperatures in Alaska, but if this La Nina materializes it may be a different story.  More/APRN Audio

49.  Got a minute? Check out this short video about the Alaska Salmon Program! (8/17).  Video

50.  Studying sockeye salmon (8/17).  Through the College of the Environment, professor of aquatic and fishery sciences Daniel Schindler helps lead the Alaska Salmon Program (ASP) — a 70-year effort to monitor salmon and their ecosystems at a suite of field camps in southwestern Alaska. In advance of the 2016 Bristol Bay sockeye salmon run, Schindler gave an inside look at the impact of the program.  More

 

51.  Low-Powered LED Lights Can Improve Snow Crab Catchability (8/11).  In 2013, The Newfoundland and Labrador snow crab fishery had the honour of becoming the 200th fishery to receive Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) certification.

Improving the catchability of snow crab, as for any fishery, has garnered significant interest, though can be challenging to achieve.

At the fourth International Marine Conservation Congress, PHD candidate Khanh Nguyen, who is based at Marine Institute, Memorial University of Newfoundland, described one way snow crab fisheries can increase catchability – and without spending vast amounts of money redesigning gear.  More

52.  Wärtsilä Designs New Efficient Stern Trawler (8/16).  Wärtsilä Ship Design has introduced a new optimised stern trawler design that will reduce fuel consumption and notably increase overall vessel efficiency compared to currently available designs. The propulsion system is based upon the Wärtsilä 31 engine, which has been recognised by Guinness World Records as being the world's most efficient 4-stroke diesel engine. The design also incorporates Wärtsilä's hybrid battery technology, which offers a significant energy efficiency improvement over conventional systems by running the engine at optimal load and absorbing many of the load fluctuations using batteries.   More

53.   The man who would map the ocean (8/18).  What do you think it would take to map the entire ocean? Larry Mayer estimates $45,000 a day and 65,246 days, or about the same amount as an unmanned mission to Mars.

“Why are we so willing to spend $3 billion to map Mars when we won’t spend the same money to map our own planet?” he asked a crowd at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute in Portland, Maine, last week.

To be fair, Google Maps has mapped a good portion of our planet since it launched in February 2005 and now provides a sometimes-unnerving level of detail.   More

54.   Researchers Developing Cheaper, Faster Monitoring Method for PSP (8/19).  Researchers are developing a field test kit that would make it easier to monitor for paralytic shellfish poisoning. Project partners include NOAA researchers from the lower 48 as well as community testers based on Kodiak Island and in the Alaska Peninsula.  More/KMXT Audio

55.  Pacific sea level predicts global temperature changes (8/18).  The amount of sea level rise in the Pacific Ocean can be used to estimate future global surface temperatures, according to a new report led by University of Arizona geoscientists.

Based on the Pacific Ocean's sea level in 2015, the team estimates by the end of 2016 the world's average surface temperature will increase up to 0.5 F (0.28 C) more than in 2014.  More

56.  Alaska Sea Grant Bookstore:  Climate Change and Alaska Fisheries (2016).  This book summarizes knowledge of North Pacific climate change and its anticipated effects on Alaska fisheries through the middle of the 21st century. Based on scientific research and observations by the public and industry, the publication focuses on fisheries effects attributable to long-term warming, looks at effects of climate variability phenomena, and considers ocean acidification. Author Terry Johnson concludes that during the working lifetime of today’s younger fishermen, effects of long-term climate change on fisheries probably will be profound but not cataclysmic. In 30 years most existing fisheries will continue to be productive, with some becoming smaller and others flourishing. To survive and prosper the industry must keep up to date on climate science, environmental changes, and advances in technology, finance, and the politics of resource management. Fishermen and communities will need to develop adaptive strategies.  More

MISC

57.  Asia Minute: Fewer Chinese Fishing Boats? (8/16).  The world’s largest fishing fleet is about to get a little bit smaller. Chinese officials say they will reduce the number of fishing boats sent out to coastal waters to help restore fish stocks. But environmental groups say that’s just part of the story. HPR’s Bill Dorman has more in today’s Asia Minute.

China’s Agriculture Minister says the country needs to cut the size of its fishing fleet saying there are “practically no fish” in the coastal East China Sea and many other coastal waters are also depleted.  More/Hawaii Public Radio Audio

58.  Garvey Schubert Barer.  50 Years of Maritime Law (8/1).  You've probably heard of the law firm Garvey Schubert Barer. If you need an attorney, especially one familiar with the ins and outs of the maritime industry, the Northwest-based law firm would be a good choice. Throughout much of its 50-year history GSB attorneys have advised and represented the maritime companies in this region.  More  Note:  Fish part towards end

59.  Corn, soybeans and salmon? (8/17).  A new company announced on August 16 that it plans to build a state-of-the-art recirculating aquaculture system (RAS) salmon production facility near the town of Harlan, in western Iowa. The facility, as proposed, will have a two-acre footprint in an industrial park. Officials of the company, known as Inland Sea-Harlan LLC, say that location was chosen because of its readily available, low cost utilities and water and excellent access to highway, interstate and air transportation.  More

 

 

Alaska Fish Radio…updated daily  by Laine Welch

17th Coast Guard District Notice to Mariners (8/17) download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Alaska Fish Related Blogs
Deckboss by Wesley Loy
Hauling Gear
Pacific Fishing Fish Wrap
Fishermen’s News
Alaska Waypoints
Alaska Marine Job Bulletin Board

2016 Calendar download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Aug 16-20.
  Aleutian Life Forum, Unalaska

Aug 18.  BOF ACR Request Deadline

Aug 21-25.  American Fisheries Society, Kansas City

Aug 22-26.  NPRB Science Panel, Anchorage

Aug 23.  Kodiak Fisheries Working Group

Aug 25.  EM Working Group, teleconference download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Aug 30.  BOF Southern Southeast Sablefish Longline Emergency Petition, Teleconference

Aug 31.  EM Working Group, Teleconference

Sep 1-10.  IUCN World Conservation Congress, Honolulu

Sep 6-7.  Monterey Bay Aquarium Seafood Watch Fisheries Standard Committee, Monterey CA

Sep 6-8.  Seafood Expo Asia, Wanchai, Hong Kong

Sep 13-15.  NPRB Advisory Panel, Anchorage

Sep 13-16.  Groundfish Plan Team, AFSC Seattle  AgendaSchedule  download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Sep 19.  Comments due on USCG fishing vessels safety regs

Sep 19-20.  Observer Advisory Committee, AFSC Traynor Room  Agenda

Sep 19-23.  NPRB, Sitka

Sep 20.  Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant Pre-proposals due for FY2017  

Sep 20-22. SE Conference Annual Meeting, Petersburg

Sep 26.  NMFS.  Comments due on scope of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a new bycatch management program for Gulf of Alaska trawl groundfish fisheries.    

Sep 26-28.  UFA Board, Anchorage Clarion Suites

Oct 3-11NPFMC, Anchorage

Oct 4.  Comment deadline for BOF Work Session 

Oct 4-6. CONEXMAR (Frozen Seafood Show), Vigo, Spain

Oct 11-13.  Pacific Salmon Commission Fall meeting, Vancouver BC

Oct 12-14.  Smoke Seafood School, Kodiak 

Oct 18-20BOF Work Session.  Kenai/Soldotna

Oct 25-27.  ASMI All hands, Captain Cook, Anchorage

Oct 28SSRAA Board of Directors Meeting, Ketchikan, Location TBA download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Nov 1-3.  MAFAC, Washington, DC 

Nov 1-4.  Center for Salmon and Society Workshop: Long-term Challenges to Alaska’s Salmon and Salmon-Dependent Communities, Anchorage

Nov 2-13.  PICES 2016 Annual Meeting, San Diego

Nov 8.  Alaska General Election.  Absentee Voting

Nov 10-11. HACCP, Kodiak 

Nov 15.  Comment deadline for BOF Lower Cook Inlet Finfish  Date Change

Nov 14-18.  Seafood Processing Quality Control Training, Kodiak

Nov 17-18.  MatSu Salmon Symposium, Palmer

Nov 17-19.  Pacific Marine Expo (aka Fish Expo), Seattle

Nov 30-Dec 3.  BOF Lower Cook Inlet Finfish, Homer Date Change

Nov 29-30.  IPHC Interim Meeting, Seattle 

Nov 30-Dec 2.  Sustainable Ocean Summit (SOS), Rotterdam   Registration

Dec 6-14.  NPFMC, Anchorage.  Council starts on Thursday

Dec 8–9.  Harmful Algal Bloom Workshop, Anchorage

Dec 27.  Comment deadline for BOF Kodiak Finfish

2017

Jan 9-13.  Pacific Salmon Commission post season meeting, Vancouver BC

Jan 23-27.  IPHC Annual Meeting, Victoria

Jan 10-13.  BOF Kodiak Finfish, Kodiak

Jan 28-Feb 7. NPFMC, Seattle

Feb 6-10.  Alaska Forum on the Environment, Anchorage

Feb 9.  Comment deadline for BOF Upper Cook Inlet Finfish

Feb 13-17.  Pacific Salmon Commission 32nd Annual Meeting, Portland, OR

Feb 22-25Pacific Seabird Group 44th Annual, Tacoma

Feb 23-Mar 8.  BOF Upper Cook Inlet Finfish, Anchorage

Feb 27.  Comment deadline for BOF Statewide King and Tanner Crab and Supplemental Issues

Mar 1.  Wild Seafood Exchange, Bellingham  download?mid=1%5f227310%5fAF4mvs4AASu2RggKXwPOLR3QYsI&pid=4&fid=Inbox&inline=1

Mar 6-11. PICES/ICES Symposium 2017, Victoria, BC

Mar 27-31.  NPRB Science Panel, Seattle

Apr 10.  BOF proposal deadline for 2017/18

Apr 24-27.  NPRB Advisory Panel, Anchorage

May 1-5.  NPRB Spring Board Meeting, Anchorage

May.  (Tbd).  Blue Vison Summit, Washington DC

May (Tbd).  NPAFC 25th Annual Meeting, British Columbia (tbd)

May 9-12.  Wakefield Symposium:  Impacts of the Environment on the Dynamics of High-Latitude Fish and Shellfish, Anchorage

Mar 13-17.  BOF statewide king and tanner crab, supplemental issues, Anchorage

Mar or May.  North American Association of Fisheries Economists Forum, La Paz, MX

Apr 10.  BOF proposals due for 2017/2018 cycle

Aug 18.  BOF ACR Request Deadline

Aug 29-24.  American Fisheries Society, Tampa

Oct 4.  Comments due to BOF Work Session

Oct 18-19.  BOF Work Session, Anchorage

Oct 17-19.  Pacific Salmon Commission Fall meeting, US Location TBD

Nov 17.  Comments due to BOF Prince William Sound finfish

Dec 1-5.  BOF Prince William Sound Finfish, Valdez

Dec 28.  Comments due to BOF SE/Yakutat finfish and shellfish

2018

Jan 11-23.  BOF Southeast and Yakutat Finfish and Shellfish, Ketchikan

Jan 22-26.  IPHC Annual Meeting, Portland

Feb 23.  Comments due to BOF Statewide Dungeness, Shrimp

Mar 6-9.  Statewide Dungeness Crab, Shrimp, and other Misc Shellfish (except Se and Yakutat), Anchorage

 

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