|  October 30, 2014  |  
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Quintillion Networks Identifies Point Hope as Subsea Fiber Landing Site

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA - The community of Point Hope has been added to the growing list of Alaska landing locations now identified for connection to the Arctic Fibre backbone by its Alaska affiliate Quintillion Networks.

The Arctic Fibre backbone is a subsea fiber optic network being laid through the Northwest Passage between London and Tokyo by Bermuda-based Arctic Fibre Limited. The Arctic Fibre backbone passes within 14 km of Point Hope and will be connected by a spur buried 2-3 meters deep. This will eliminate the possibility of any damage to the cable by ice scour.

Point Hope is one of seven landing sites currently under development. Other communities to be connected to the Quintillion Network by the end of 2015 include: Prudhoe Bay, Barrow, Wainwright, Kotzebue, Nome and Shemya. The communities serviced by the Quintillion Networks project will have access to affordable and virtually unlimited Internet. The affordability and capacity of this project can provide a wide range of new opportunities for Internet services for schools, local governments, health care providers, Alaska Native Corporations and rural businesses. Alaska communities will initially have 100 gigabits at their disposal whereas satellite and microwave deployments are generally limited by technical and cost considerations to less than one gigabit.

Alaska-based Quintillion Networks is the exclusive carrier-neutral partner of Arctic Fibre and is managing the development of all Alaska connectivity to the Arctic Fibre backbone. As a “middle mile” provider, Quintillion is available to all “last mile” providers in each community to deliver high-speed broadband service to their customers.

Quintillion Networks CEO Elizabeth Pierce says, "The journey is just beginning and we are excited to add Point Hope to the list of sites where we will provide increased bandwidth. Our business model is based on helping rural Alaska communities use the Internet as a communication, education and business growth tool.”

ASTAC, the Arctic Slope Telephone Association Cooperative, is a service provider contracting with Quintillion to use the new fiber optic network in Point Hope. Jens Laipenieks, manager of sales and business development for ASTAC said, "With the addition of the fourth North Slope Borough landing at Point Hope, our largest population center outside of Barrow, we now have a strategic spread of true broadband landings along the North Slope coast. This represents a transformational/generational opportunity for e-learning, economic stimulus, rural health care, public safety, interaction with government and social connections."

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