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Regional and State Employment, Unemployment for April

Regional and state unemployment rates were generally little changed or slightly
lower in April. Thirty-nine states recorded unemployment rate decreases,
three states and the District of Columbia registered rate increases, and eight
states had no rate change, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today.
Forty-six states and the District of Columbia posted unemployment rate decreases
from a year earlier, three states reported increases, and one state had no
change. The national jobless rate edged up by 0.2 percentage point between March
and April to 9.0 percent, but was 0.8 point lower than a year earlier.

In April nonfarm payroll employment increased in 42 states and the District of
Columbia and decreased in 8 states. The largest over-the-month increase in
employment occurred in New York (+45,700), followed by Texas (+32,900),
Pennsylvania (+23,700), Massachusetts (+19,500), and Florida (+14,900).
Nebraska experienced the largest over-the-month percentage increase in
employment (+0.9 percent), followed by Kansas and Oklahoma (+0.8 percent each)
and Louisiana and New Hampshire (+0.7 percent each). The largest over-the-month
decrease in employment occurred in Michigan (-10,200), followed by Minnesota
(-5,200), South Carolina (-3,800), Indiana (-2,500), and Vermont (-2,200).
Vermont experienced the largest over-the-month percentage decline in employment
(-0.7 percent), followed by Michigan (-0.3 percent), and Idaho, Minnesota, and
South Carolina (-0.2 percent each). Over the year, nonfarm employment increased
in 46 states and the District of Columbia and decreased in 4 states. The largest
over-the-year percentage increase occurred in North Dakota (+3.9 percent),
followed by Alaska and Texas (+2.5 percent each) and Nebraska (+1.9 percent).
The four states reporting over-the-year percentage declines in employment were
New Jersey (-0.2 percent), and Nevada, New Mexico, and South Dakota (less than
-0.1 percent each).


    ____________________________________________________________________________
   |                                                                            |
   |              Changes to Current Employment Statistics Data                 |
   |                                                                            |
   |With the release of preliminary April 2011 data, state and area nonfarm     |
   |employment estimates incorporate net business birth/death adjustment        |
   |factors estimated on a quarterly basis, replacing the previous practice     |
   |of estimating the factors annually. This allows the state and area          |
   |nonfarm employment estimates to incorporate information from the            |
   |Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages into the net birth/death adjustment|
   |factors as soon as it becomes available and thereby improve the factors.    |
   |____________________________________________________________________________|



Regional Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)

The West reported the highest regional unemployment rate in April, 10.4 percent,
while the Northeast and Midwest recorded the lowest rates, 8.0 and 8.1 percent,
respectively. Over the month, all four regions experienced statistically
significant jobless rate declines, the largest of which was recorded in the
West (-0.3 percentage point). All four regions also registered significant rate
decreases from a year earlier: the Midwest (-1.6 percentage points), Northeast
(-0.8 point), West (-0.7 point), and South (-0.6 point). (See table 1.)

Among the nine geographic divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest
jobless rate, 11.1 percent in April. The West North Central again registered the
lowest rate, 6.8 percent. Three divisions experienced statistically significant
unemployment rate changes from a month earlier, all of which were decreases: the
Mountain (-0.4 percentage point) and Pacific and South Atlantic (-0.2 point each).
No division had a statistically significant over-the-month rate increase. Over the
year, six divisions posted significant rate decreases, the largest of which was in
the East North Central (-2.1 percentage points). No division experienced an
unemployment rate increase from a year earlier.

State Unemployment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Nevada continued to register the highest unemployment rate among the states,
12.5 percent in April. California recorded the next highest rate, 11.9 percent.
North Dakota reported the lowest jobless rate, 3.3 percent, followed by Nebraska,
4.2 percent, and New Hampshire and South Dakota, 4.9 percent each. In total 24
states posted jobless rates significantly lower than the U.S. figure of 9.0
percent, 7 states recorded measurably higher rates, and 19 states and the
District of Columbia had rates that were not appreciably different from that of
the nation. (See tables A and 3.)

Nevada experienced the largest over-the-month unemployment rate decrease in April
(-0.7 percentage point), followed by New Mexico and Oklahoma (-0.5 point each).
Fifteen other states also posted statistically significant rate declines from
March. The remaining 32 states and the District of Columbia registered jobless
rates that were not measurably different from those of a month earlier, though
some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant
changes. (See table B.)

Michigan recorded the largest jobless rate decrease from April 2010 (-2.9
percentage points). Three other states had rate decreases of more than 2.0
percentage points: Nevada (-2.4 points), Indiana (-2.3 points), and Illinois
(-2.1 points). Sixteen additional states had smaller but also statistically
significant decreases over the year. The remaining 30 states and the District of
Columbia registered unemployment rates that were not appreciably different from
those of a year earlier. (See table C.)

Nonfarm Payroll Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Over the month, 19 states recorded statistically significant changes in
employment. The largest over-the-month statistically significant job gains
occurred in New York (+45,700), Texas (+32,900), Pennsylvania (+23,700), and
Massachusetts (+19,500). Two states experienced statistically significant
over-the-month declines in employment: Michigan (-10,200) and Vermont (-2,200).
(See tables D and 5.)

Over the year, 23 states experienced statistically significant changes in
employment, all of which were increases. The largest increase occurred in Texas
(+254,400), followed by California (+144,200), Pennsylvania (+80,000), Ohio
(+67,000), and Illinois (+66,600). (See table E.)

____________
The Metropolitan Area Employment and Unemployment news release for April is
scheduled to be released on Wednesday, June 1, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. (EDT). The
Regional and State Employment and Unemployment news release for May is scheduled
to be released on Friday, June 17, 2011, at 10:00 a.m. (EDT).



Table A.  States with unemployment rates significantly differ-
ent from that of the U.S., April 2011, seasonally adjusted
---------------------------------------------------------------
                State                |          Rate(p)
---------------------------------------------------------------
United States (1) ...................|           9.0
                                     |
Alaska ..............................|           7.3
Arkansas ............................|           7.7
California ..........................|          11.9
Florida .............................|          10.8
Georgia .............................|           9.9
Hawaii ..............................|           6.1
Iowa ................................|           6.0
Kansas ..............................|           6.7
Maine ...............................|           7.6
Maryland ............................|           6.8
                                     |
Massachusetts .......................|           7.8
Michigan ............................|          10.2
Minnesota ...........................|           6.5
Mississippi .........................|          10.4
Montana .............................|           7.3
Nebraska ............................|           4.2
Nevada ..............................|          12.5
New Hampshire .......................|           4.9
New Mexico ..........................|           7.6
New York ............................|           7.9
                                     |
North Dakota ........................|           3.3
Oklahoma ............................|           5.6
Pennsylvania ........................|           7.5
Rhode Island ........................|          10.9
South Dakota ........................|           4.9
Texas ...............................|           8.0
Utah ................................|           7.4
Vermont .............................|           5.3
Virginia ............................|           6.1
Wisconsin ...........................|           7.3
Wyoming .............................|           6.0
---------------------------------------------------------------
   1 Data are not preliminary.
   p = preliminary.


More tables and data...

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