|  July 23, 2014  |  
Mostly Cloudy   65.0F  |  Forecast »
Bookmark and Share Email this page Email Print this page Print Feed Feed

Computers Analyze Environmental Factors in Diabetes

Approach could shed light on many complex diseases

What: Like many complex diseases, diabetes results from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. To examine genetic risk factors, scientists pore over the human genome sequence. Environmental factors have been trickier to pin down because there is no way to evaluate them comprehensively.

Now, researchers at Stanford University present what they call an environment-wide association study (EWAS) or a systematic examination of the contributions of hundreds of factors in the development of Type 2 diabetes. This "enviromics" approach, which mirrors genome-wide association studies, harnesses high-speed computers and publicly accessible databases.

The first-of-its-kind study, which was funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), appears in the May 20, 2010, issue of PLoS One.

The authors examined 226 separate environmental factors like nutrition and exposure to bacteria, viruses, allergens and toxins. They found that certain factors, notably a pesticide derivative and the environmental contaminant PCB, were strongly associated with the development of diabetes. Other factors, including the nutrient beta-carotene, served a protective role.

The scientists describe their work as a demonstration that computational approaches can reveal as much about environmental contributions to disease as about genetic factors. They posit that the technique could be applied to other complex diseases like obesity, hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

The authors acknowledge that many challenges remain, including the fact that, unlike the genome, "the environment is boundless."

Article: Patel CJ, Bhattacharya J, Butte AJ (2010) An Environment-Wide Association Study (EWAS) on Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. PLoS ONE 5(5): e10746.doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0010746.

Who: Jeremy M. Berg, Ph.D., director of the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), which played a leading role in supporting the research, is available to comment on this article.

In addition to NIGMS, the work was supported by NIH's National Library of Medicine and National Institute on Aging.

NIGMS is a part of NIH that supports basic research to increase our understanding of life processes and lay the foundation for advances in disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. For more information on the Institute's research and training programs, see http://www.nigms.nih.gov.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) - The Nation's Medical Research Agency - includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

Add your comment:
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement