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State’s Former Senior Assistant Attorney General Cam Leonard Boosts Firm’s Environment, Energy & Resources Practice

Cameron (“Cam”) M. Leonard

Cameron (“Cam”) M. Leonard

ANCHORAGE (March 19, 2013) – Perkins Coie is pleased to announce that Cameron (“Cam”) M. Leonard, most recently Senior Assistant Attorney General with the Alaska Department of Law, has joined the firm’s Anchorage office in the firm’s Environment, Energy & Resources practice group. As Senior Assistant AG, Leonard was lead counsel for the State of Alaska in two cases before the U.S. Supreme Court: Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation v. EPA, a Clean Air Act dispute arising at the Red Dog Mine; and Coeur Alaska Inc. v. Southeast Alaska Conservation Council, a Clean Water Act case over the permitting of the Kensington Mine.

“Cam is a nationally recognized environmental and natural resources lawyer, having served as lead lawyer for the State of Alaska in many of the state’s most high profile issues over the past 20+ years,” said Eric Fjelstad, Office Managing Partner of Perkins Coie’s Anchorage office. “As the top mining attorney for the state, he has led Alaska’s work on some of the largest and most controversial mining projects. I’ve known Cam for more than 15 years and have always been impressed with his legal acumen and practical approach to lawyering. We are thrilled that Cam is joining our growing resources group.”

Tom Lindley, Chair of Perkins Coie’s Environment, Energy & Resources practice group, added, “There are few attorneys with Cam’s experience and profile. He is an outstanding addition to both our busy practice in Alaska and to our national group. His experience will not only benefit our Alaska-based clients, but many of those in the Lower 48.”

Leonard’s arrival follows two other recent additions to the firm’s Environment, Energy & Resources practice group: Jim McTarnaghan (San Francisco), and Arthur Haubenstock (San Francisco).

Leonard earned his J.D. from Boalt Hall, University of California, Berkeley, School of Law, where he was Associate Editor of the Ecology Law Quarterly and where he won the American Jurisprudence Award, Administrative Law (1982) and the American Jurisprudence Award, Torts (1981). He received his B.A., History, from Cornell University. During law school, Leonard was an Extern with the California State Public Defenders and after receiving his J.D., he served as a clerk for Chief Justice Jay A. Rabinowitz of the Alaska Supreme Court.

In addition to his legal practice, Leonard served on the Alaska Legal Services Board of Directors and was Alaska’s civil law representative to, and past chair of, the Western States Hazardous Waste Project, an EPA-sponsored regional network of twelve western states and Canadian provinces, designed to enhance and coordinate its members’ environmental enforcement capacities. He also served on the Chena Riverfront Commission (including 4 years as Chairman) advising the City and Borough governments on issues relating to riverfront development and protection.

Perkins Coie’s Environment, Energy & Resources practice assists government agencies and private clients nationwide. For more than 60 years, the firm has had an active energy law practice representing investor-owned utilities, renewable energy developers, and a variety of power producers. With 80+ attorneys focused on environmental, energy and resources matters, Perkins Coie is widely recognized for its breadth, depth, experience and capability.

About Perkins Coie: Founded in 1912, Perkins Coie has more than 900 lawyers in 19 offices across the United States and Asia. We provide a full array of corporate, commercial litigation and intellectual property legal services to a broad range of clients, from FORTUNE 50 corporations to small, independent start-ups, as well as public and not-for-profit organizations. For more information, please visit www.perkinscoie.com.

 

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