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Delta Air Lines plans to increase jet fuel yield at Trainer refinery

graphs of Range of U.S. jet fuel refinery yield by region and U.S. refiner production of jet fuel by region, 2011 as described in the article text

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form 810, Monthly Refinery Report.
Notes: Regions defined by PADDs. Data include only refineries that produce jet fuel. Data excludes production in Hawaii and Alaska. Yield = [Jet Fuel Production / (Crude Oil + Net Unfinished Oil Inputs)] x 100. The volume-weighted average yields, or black bands in the chart, represent the annual average jet fuel refinery yields for refineries in each region for 2011.

Delta Air Lines recently purchased the Phillips 66 Trainer refinery, which is located in the Philadelphia area and had been idle since the fourth quarter of 2011. In a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) regulatory (8K) filing, Delta Air Lines indicated that it plans to increase Trainer's jet fuel yield to 32%, higher than was previously seen at Trainer and significantly above the average yield of jet fuel in any U.S. refining region. Delta says a capital investment of $100 million is necessary to shift the refinery's jet fuel yield. Jet fuel production and yield (see charts above) currently vary across the country.

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tags: gasoline , Gulf Coast , liquid fuels , oil/petroleum , Pennsylvania , production , refining


Jun 11, 2012

U.S. dry natural gas production growth levels off following decline in natural gas prices

graph of Monthly U.S. dry natural gas production and Henry Hub natural gas spot price, January 2005 - March 2012, as described in the article text
Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Natural Gas Monthly. Henry Hub spot natural gas price (monthly average), based on Thomson Reuters.

U.S. dry natural gas production has increased since late 2005 due mainly to rapid growth in production from shale gas resources. However, there have been two notable instances (see red ovals in the chart) in the last seven years when natural gas production leveled off during a period of falling spot natural gas prices. The first was during the recent economic recession and the latest began in the fourth quarter of 2011 and continued through the first quarter of 2012.

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Jun 8, 2012

U.S. crude oil production in first quarter of 2012 highest in 14 years

graph of United States crude oil Production, 1998-2012, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Petroleum Supply Monthly.

Strong growth in U.S. crude oil production since the fourth quarter of 2011 is due mainly to higher output from North Dakota, Texas,and federal leases in the Gulf of Mexico, with total U.S. production during the first quarter of 2012 topping 6 million barrels per day (bbl/d) for the first time in 14 years.

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Jun 7, 2012

Northeast electricity markets react to hot weather in late May

graph of New York Independent System Operator real-time wholesale electricity prices and demand for select zones, May 29, 2012, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on New York Independent System Operator.
Note: Prices represent select NYISO zones.

Temperatures in and around New York and Pennsylvania were 10-20 degrees warmer than normal on Tuesday, May 29, lifting electricity demand above seasonal norms. Peak demand in the area served by the New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) was above 28 gigawatts (GW), about 18% below the all-time peak of 34 GW, but high enough to make real-time wholesale prices spike to almost $1,000 per megawatthour (MWh). Adjacent areas in New England and Pennsylvania also saw high real-time wholesale prices.

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Jun 6, 2012

Residential Energy Consumption Survey data show decreased energy consumption per household

graph of Average energy consumption per home and number of housing units, 1980-2009, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey.
Note: Includes occupied, primary housing units only.

Total U.S. energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the number and average size of housing units, according to the latest results from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The average household consumed 90 million British thermal units (Btu) in 2009, based on RECS data. This continues the downward trend in average per-household energy consumption of the last 30 years. Improvements in efficiency for space heating, air conditioning, and major appliances have all led to decreased consumption per household, despite increases in the number of homes, the average size of homes, and the use of electronics. Newer homes also tend to feature better insulation and other characteristics, such as double-pane windows, that improve the building envelope.

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Jun 5, 2012

U.S. coal’s share of total net generation continues to decline

graph of Share of total net generation by fuel type, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly.
Download CSV Data

Amid historically low natural gas prices and the warmest March ever recorded in much of the United States, coal's share of total net generation dropped to 34%—the lowest level since at least January 1973 (the earliest date for which EIA has monthly statistics). Despite seasonally low loads, natural gas-fired generation grew markedly and accounted for 30% of overall net generation by March 2012 (see chart above). Total electricity demand fell this winter as warmer weather reduced home heating requirements.

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Jun 4, 2012

NOAA predicts a near-normal 2012 Atlantic hurricane season

map of NOAA predicts a near-normal 2012 Atlantic hurricane season, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on NOAA, Climate Prediction Center, Atlantic Hurricane Outlook.

On May 24, 2012, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center said that, for the six-month hurricane season beginning June 1, there is a 70% chance of 9 to 15 named storms in the Atlantic Basin, of which 4 to 8 may strengthen to hurricanes. Of those, 1 to 3 may become major hurricanes (Category 3, 4, or 5). During the hurricane season from 1981 through 2010, the Atlantic basin averaged 12 named storms and 6 hurricanes each year—3 of which were major hurricanes.

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Jun 1, 2012

Reserve electric generating capacity helps keep the lights on

map of Regional reserve margin estimates and targets for summer 2012, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on North American Electric Reliability Corporation, 2012 Summer Short-Term Reliability Assessment.

The electricity utility industry employs a simple strategy for maintaining reliability: always have more supply available than may be required. Yet it can be difficult to forecast future electricity demand, and building new generating capacity can take years. The industry regularly monitors the supply situation using a measure called reserve margin. Regional estimates of reserve margins are compared to pre-determined target levels to assess supply adequacy.

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May 31, 2012

Coal stockpiles above five-year range in first quarter of 2012

graph of Monthly U.S. coal stockpile levels at electric power plants, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Electric Power Monthly.
Download CSV Data

Estimated coal stockpiles at U.S. electric power plants in March 2012 (latest EIA data available) were about 196 million short tons, almost 18% above the level in March 2011 and above the five-year range. Coal stockpiles are up as a result of declines in coal consumption by electric power plants.

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May 30, 2012

Japan’s use of thermal generation is up since March 2011 due to nuclear plant outages

graph of Monthly average generation by electric utilities in Japan, by source, January 2007 - April 2012, as described in the article text
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on Bloomberg, L.P.

Japan's use of thermal generation—the combined amount of electricity generated from natural gas, oil, and coal-fired plants—was up 40% for January-April 2012, compared to the same period in 2011 due to the Tohoku earthquake and related tsunami that led to the accident at Tokyo Electric Power Company's (TEPCO) Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and subsequent outages at other plants (see chart above).

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