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STATE ENERGY DATA RELEASE—February 1, 2013

State-level estimates of consumption, prices, and expenditures for distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and kerosene through 2011

State Energy Data System (SEDS) estimates for distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, and kerosene, for data year 2011, are available at SEDS Updates

  • U.S. consumption of distillate fuel oil totaled 8.3 quadrillion Btu in 2011, a 3-percent increase from 2010.  The top consuming states were Texas, California, Pennsylvania, and New York. 
  • U.S. consumption of residual fuel oil fell to 1.1 quadrillion Btu from 1.2 quadrillion Btu in 2010, a 14-percent decrease.  The top consuming states were Texas, California, Louisiana, and Florida.
  • U.S. consumption of kerosene fell to 25.3 trillion Btu from 41.2 trillion Btu in 2010, a 39-percent decrease.  The top consuming states were New York, Pennsylvania, Maine, and North Carolina.
  • The U.S. average distillate fuel oil price rose to $26.77 per million Btu from $20.62 per million Btu in 2010, a 30-percent increase.  The U.S. average residual fuel oil price rose to $15.68 per million Btu from $11.70 per million Btu in 2010, a 34-percent increase.

SEDS provides annual state-level estimates of energy consumption, prices, and expenditures by sector and energy source.  A full set of state-level estimates for all fuels, all sectors, and all years through data year 2011 will be released in June 2013.

 

Weather and other events can cause disruptions to gasoline infrastructure and supply ›

The gasoline supply chain has five main parts: producing or importing crude oil; importing gasoline; refining the crude oil into gasoline; blending gasoline with ethanol at distribution terminals; and selling the gasoline at retail stations. Between each part, various storage and distribution logistics steps are involved to move and store both crude oil and gasoline. Disruptions can affect any part of the supply chain.  More

Diagram of the gasoline supply chain.

Source: EIA

 

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