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Governor Parnell: “Put Alaskans to Work”

Legislature Asked to Fund Deferred Maintenance Projects Early

February 1, 2010, Juneau, Alaska – Governor Sean Parnell submitted a supplemental appropriations bill today in which he asks the Legislature to expedite approval of  $100 million to address the backlog of deferred maintenance projects for state facilities, to guarantee that jobs will be retained and created for the upcoming construction season.

“I am asking the Legislature to approve these funds by March 1, so that state agencies can start the process to secure contractors to do the work now, rather than waiting until the beginning of the next fiscal year on July 1,” Governor Parnell said. “Given the loss of jobs in Alaska’s construction sector in 2009, it is important to get these projects to contractors as soon as possible. Let’s put Alaskans to work.”

The state and the university have more than 2,300 buildings statewide with $1.9 billion in deferred maintenance. The necessary work in buildings includes upgrades to electrical and heating systems, replacement of leaking roofs and installation of insulation and new plumbing. The supplemental appropriations also cover all modes of transportation — highway, aviation and ferries — including road surface repairs, guardrails, culverts, bridges, harbors, terminals and vessels.

Governor Parnell has proposed a five-year plan in which $100 million of deferred maintenance projects would be funded annually.

“Deferred maintenance funding is necessary to preserve the state’s significant investment in infrastructure and will mean Alaska’s contractors and laborers will have jobs they can depend on, each and every year,” Governor Parnell said. 

More detailed information on the budget is available on the Office of Management & Budget website at http://omb.alaska.gov/

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