|  September 16, 2014  |  
Overcast   49.0F  |  Forecast »

Alaska Railroad asks photographers to adhere to Railbelt safety guidelines

ANCHORAGE - With snow accumulating in all portions of the Railbelt, the Alaska Railroad Corporation’s snow-cleared tracks and right of way become prime scenic and train photography locations. The railroad urges photographers to resist the temptation to take photographs of trains and Alaska's beautiful scenery from railroad property.
 
In most areas the railroad right of way extends 100 feet on either side of the track. Unless they are on the edge of a public road or trail, people should not be inside this safety zone.

"Walking on or near railroad tracks is extremely dangerous because you never know when a train will come along," said Dan Frerich, Alaska Railroad chief special agent. "We urge professional and amateur photographers alike to set the right example for others by adhering to the safety guidelines. It can take a mile or more to stop a train and by the time a locomotive engineer sees you on the track, it is too late."

According to the Federal Railroad Administration, 442 people died and 388 were injured while trespassing on railroad property throughout the United States in 2010. In addition to the dangers of being near the track, it is also unlawful; trespassers face the possibility of up to 90 days in jail and a $5,000 fine.

The Alaska Railroad is committed to public safety through outreach channels such as community events, media outreach, law enforcement partnerships, employee resource groups and Operation Lifesaver. The Alaska Railroad public safety initiatives bring together communities in a collaborative and caring effort to promote railroad grade crossing and pedestrian safety.
 
The Alaska Railroad provides year-round passenger train service for a number of communities across Alaska.  With summer and winter service, passenger trains run from Seward to Fairbanks. More information on the Alaska Railroad and Alaska Railroad Vacations can be found at www.AlaskaRailroad.com.
 

Add your comment:
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement