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August 2017

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Articles

Recycling in Alaska

When we hear or see the word “recycling,” we often think of a soda can, glass bottle, or plastic wrapping being tossed into a large, green receptacle emblazoned with the ubiquitous recycling symbol. But there is much more involved in implementing a community recycling program than placing a few recycling bins around city parks and in public gathering spots, especially in Alaska.

Hazardous Waste Disposal in Rural Alaska

Most of us are familiar with how typical garbage disposal works. Whether you have a pick up service to empty your trash barrels or receptacle or you drive to and empty your refuse at a local landfill, if you’re in any of Alaska’s regional urban zones there are plenty of options for trash disposal.

Rethinking Recycling

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Since the early 1970s that slogan has been used to bring awareness to increasing air pollution, water contamination, and unchecked waste. In many parts of the Lower 48, recycling is not just second nature, it’s expected. Instead of pushing one garbage bin the curb for pickup, residents line up their municipality-provided recycling bins with their contents meticulously separated into paper, plastic, glass, and “other.”

TAPS After Forty Years

There are few, if any, in Alaska who can say they haven’t been affected by the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)—in one way or another.

Graphic Design III

Jontue Hollingsworth, owner of graphic design company Headron Collider, says design “has always been a part of me; I’ve always been creative.” It was while Hollingsworth was attending college to study industrial technology that he learned graphic design is a career “where I could be a professional and be creative at the same time.” He switched his major two years into school.
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