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Exciting News from Bean's Cafe

We won $5,000 from Alyeska Pipeline!

Bean's Cafe is one of three lucky winners of Alyeska Pipeline's $5K for 35 Philanthropy Poll.

The Philanthropy Poll was part of Alyeska Pipeline's 35th Anniversary of safely transporting oil across Alaska. Company employees selected 35 Alaska nonprofits, divided into three regional groups, to participate in the poll.

The poll was conducted on Alyeska Pipeline's website and open to the general public. It attracted over 7,000 voters. 

 

Bean's Café would like to thank everyone who voted in the online poll as well as Alyeska Pipeline for their generous grant.  

 

To view the final poll results and the other two nonprofits that won, click here.

 

 

Volunteers needed for the State Fair!
 
For the first time, Bean's Cafe will have a booth at the Alaska State Fair. If you would like to help Bean's Cafe by volunteering at our booth, please contact Laura at llyznicki@beanscafe.org. Thank you! 
 
 

 

Groupon Grassroots: A First for Alaska
 

Next week, Bean's Cafe will team up with Groupon Grassroots to fund the purchase of kitchen supplies.

Grassroots is a community outreach initiative within Groupon that brings people together to do good, have fun, and create positive change in their community. Our goal is to raise $380 to buy a set of new bowls and spoons for Bean's Cafe. We will do so through a week-long, online fundraising campaign on the Groupon website.

It's important that we build momentum for our campaign and you are essential to this effort. If you haven't already done so, subscribe to Groupon in Anchorage before our campaign launches on August 20th. That way, you'll be ready to view and support our campaign as soon as it goes live.

Denali Alaskan Federal Credit Union has generously agreed to match up to $500 for our project. With their support and yours, we're confident we'll have a successful and exciting campaign.

Getting to know our clients 
Part two: Frank

 

Mischell Anderson recently completed an education externship at Bean's Cafe. During her time here, she conducted oral histories with five clients. This article is the second in a five-part series entitled "Getting to know our clients." Each edition will include excerpts from one of Mischell's oral histories.  


 

Frank was born in Seward, Alaska on March 25, 1963, exactly one year and two days before the great 1964 earthquake. Unfortunately, Frank's father was killed in the earthquake so he and his mother left Seward the very next day. They went to live in the village of Gambell on Saint Lawrence Island, where the majority of their family was located.

 

Frank indicated that he is not Alaska native, but Siberian. His family lived for many generations in the small town of Avania in Siberia. They came to St. Lawrence in 1936, "before the iron curtain fell."

 

Frank speaks longingly of the time he spent on the Bering Sea around St. Lawrence. He spent most of that time hunting for "Walruses, whales, seals... anything from the sea." He loves to eat any type of seafood and says, "Just a little seal oil and salt makes everything from the sea the perfect food."

 

Unfortunately, Frank has not been able to return to St. Lawrence and the Bering Sea since he left there in 1989. He moved to Anchorage to find work.  

 

In 1993, Frank came to the Brother Francis shelter and Bean's Café. He has been here nearly every day since. He is currently working to get himself on disability and the Cook Inlet Tribal Council is helping him organize this. His goal is to get an apartment with his disability money and "find a good cook" to live with.

 

What Frank would really like is to return to St. Lawrence and the sea. "My house is the sea," he says and there is so much he still wishes to do there. He has written a song about this in the "Native Siberian way," just like his grandfather used to. It begins:

            Right here, right now I'm gonna sing a song.

            Right here, right now, I'm gonna sing a song.

 

Frank

To read Frank's full oral history, click here.

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