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Frederick Appointed Chief Administrative Law Judge

March 28, 2014, Juneau, Alaska - Governor Sean Parnell today appointed Kathleen Frederick as the chief administrative law judge. The chief administrative law judge oversees the Office of Administrative Hearings (OAH) and carries out statutory duties created to support improvement of executive branch adjudication processes.

“Kathleen brings years of professional legal knowledge, and administrative and judicial proceeding experience to this position,” said Governor Parnell. “She has demonstrated her leadership in the community and will make a great addition to OAH.”

Frederick, of Palmer, has practiced law for 30 years. She currently is an attorney for the State of Alaska Office of Elder Fraud and Assistance. Frederick previously worked as an associate attorney at Baxter Bruce & Sullivan, P.C., and also as a managing attorney with Frederick & Associates, specializing in corporate law, real estate law, Alaska Native law, employment law, and mediation. She is a board member for the Palmer Museum and has served as a commissioner for the Alaska Public Offices Commission, and the Alaska Public Broadcasting Commission. Frederick received a bachelor’s degree from Gettysburg College, a juris doctorate from Villanova School of Law, and a certificate of mediation from Pepperdine University. 

An independent adjudicatory agency, OAH hears more than 60 categories of executive branch contested cases, including tax appeals, retirement and benefits, professional and facilities licensing, Human Rights Commission discrimination matters, environmental permitting and compliance, Ethics Act cases, and several high-volume categories (e.g., child support, Medicaid benefits, public assistance matters, and PFD eligibility). The chief judge supervises a staff of ten administrative law judges and four support persons who collectively handle upwards of 2,000 cases per year. 

The chief administrative law judge is appointed to a five-year term by the governor and is subject to confirmation by the Legislature.

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