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ICYMI - Rio Tinto CEO: No Interest in Open Pit Pebble Mine

Pebble partner splits with Anglo American on development plans for Pebble Mine

 
The Pebble Mine was supposed to be the largest open pit mine in North America and sit astride the headwaters of Alaska's Bristol Bay - home to the world's largest sockeye salmon fishery.

Last year, local residents stood up for Bristol Bay and passed the Save Our Salmon (SOS) Initiative to prevent the advancement of any large-scale resource extraction activity, including mining activities, which would destroy or degrade salmon habitats.

The CEO of  Rio Tinto, one of the mining companies invested in the project, recently said he is no longer interested in the Pebble Project proceeding as an open pit mine. However, he still believes the project should move forward despite overwhelming evidence that the mine would have devastating consequences for Alaska's salmon population.

Rio Tinto CEO: No Interest in Pebble Project as Open Pit Mine
Dow Jones Newswire
April 19, 2012

"Rio Tinto PLC (RIO) has no interest in seeing the Alaskan copper and gold Pebble project developed as an open pit mine given the concerns about its environmental impact, although it thinks it would be worth exploring the project as an underground mine.

"An open pit mine is not the way to go...in my opinion," [Rio Tinto's CEO Tom Albanese] added.

"The Pebble project, located in southwestern Alaska, is one of the world's largest undeveloped gold and copper deposits and has faced protests from activists who allege it could harm an important spawning habitat for wild sockeye salmon, as well as damage communities around Bristol Bay that depend on fishing."

Read the full story here.
 

 

Alaskans for Bristol Bay
Alaskans for Bristol Bay is a 501(c)(6) organization dedicated to preventing the destruction of the largest wild salmon fishery on earth. The Bristol Bay headwaters support abundant wildlife, local subsistence with a 10,000 year history, and world class commercial and sport fishing opportunities.

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