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Bill Aimed at Helping Military Personnel Passes House

HB 345 waives CDL test for military personnel with commercial-grade experience in the armed services

Wednesday, April 4, 2012, Juneau, Alaska – Legislation aimed at helping military personnel transfer their driving experience in the armed services to the civilian workforce unanimously passed the Alaska House today.

House Bill 345, by Rep. Dan Saddler, would allow the state of Alaska to waive the commercial driver’s license (CDL) road skills test for eligible Alaska military personnel who earned their driving experience operating commercial-grade vehicles in the armed services. The bill seeks to help military drivers who are about to leave or have recently left military service put their experience to work, and to help Alaska businesses hire experienced drivers.

Saddler said that impending budget cuts and troop reductions mean thousands of Alaska service members, including active duty, Guard and Reserve, will soon be hanging up their uniforms and seeking civilian jobs.

“Alaskans who honed their driving skills while in service to our nation deserve to have that experience validated and honored in the civilian workforce,” Saddler, R-JBER/Eagle River, said. “HB 345 is an important tool to help them obtain the credentials they need to land good civilian jobs, and to help Alaska employers hire skilled and motivated employees.”

To be eligible for a waiver, drivers must have spent the last two or more years driving the kind of equipment they expect to use in a civilian job and worked as military drivers in the past 90 days. In addition, they must never have had any license suspended or revoked, had more than one minor traffic violation, been convicted of any driving offense involving drugs or alcohol, or have been convicted for any serious violation involving an accident within two years before their employment.

The bill now moves to the Alaska Senate for consideration.

 

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