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BLM-Alaska hosts April NPR-A lecture series

Anchorage—With its remote location on Alaska’s North Slope, the National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska (NPR-A) is a place few get to visit, yet is home to some of our nation’s most significant and important resources.  It is a place of oil and gas reserves, where the Teshekpuk and Western Arctic caribou herds breed and graze and numerous species of waterfowl breed and nest in its world-class nesting grounds.  Every Thursday during the month of April, BLM-Alaska is offering a public lecture series, “Understanding Alaska’s National Petroleum Reserve,” about the NPR-A.  The science lectures will take place at the BLM Campbell Creek Science Center, 5600 Science Center Drive.  The science lectures will take place at 7 p.m. at the BLM Campbell Creek Science Center, 5600 Science Center Drive.  The entrance to the Campbell Creek Science Center is near 68th Avenue off Elmore Road.  The four lectures are:

  • April 5: People, Land, & Resources

The National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska stretches from the Brooks Range to the Arctic Coast. Join Stacie McIntosh, supervisor of the BLM Arctic Field Office, for an overview of this unique reserve and the challenges and opportunities it presents for the BLM.

  • April 12: Prehistory of the NPR-A

Join us as BLM archaeologist Mike Kunz of the BLM Arctic Field Office describes the story of human migration from the Old World into what is now Alaska.

  • April 19: Looking for Oil in the NPR-A

Come learn about the geology of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska.  Lou Niglio, geophysicist with the BLM-Alaska State Office, will describe efforts to find and develop the area’s oil resources.

  • April 26: Birds of the NPR-A

Come discover the tremendous variety of bird life found in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska.  Join Debbie Nigro, wildlife biologist of the BLM Arctic Field Office, to learn more about particular bird species that BLM has identified as being of special conservation concern.

For additional information please call 907-267-1247 or visit http://www.blm.gov/ak/st/en/prog/sciencecenter.html

The BLM manages more land – 256 million surface acres – than any other Federal agency. Most of this public land is located in 12 Western States, including 75 million in Alaska. The Bureau, with a budget of about $1 billion, also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM’s multiple-use mission is to sustain the health and productivity of the public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. The Bureau accomplishes this by managing such activities as outdoor recreation, livestock grazing, mineral development, and energy production, and by conserving natural, historical, and cultural resources on the public lands.

 

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